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li'J 



^ra^''* 




1954 



Elchanite 




elcha 





talmudical 

academy 

brooklyn 


# 
• 
• 


1060 president st. 


June 
1954 


brooklyn, n. y. 




o 

h 

to 



C^tch 



unue 



iti 




3 


DEDICATION 


4 


SCHOOL DRAWING 


5 


ADMINISTRATION 


6 


ELCHANITE EDITORS 


8 


FACULTY 


13 


SENIORS 


14 


Graduates 


30 


Diary 


34 


Autographs and Addresses 


36 


Honors 


37 


ACTIVITIES 


38 


G.O. 


41 


Student Court 


42 


Service Squad 


44 


Arista 


45 


Elchanite Squad 


46 


Topics 


47 


Kolenu 


48 


English Library 


50 


Hebrew Library — Sifriyon 


52 


Debating Team 


54 


Co-op Store 


55 


Variety Nite 


56 


Club Pictures 


58 


Varsity Basketball 


61 


J.V. Basketball 


62 


Intra-murals 


63 


LITERATURE 


65 


That's the Reason — A Poem 


66 


Tracing American-Jewish Literature 


70 


Jewish Contributions to American Jurisprudence 




and Statesmanship 


75 


ADVERTISEMENTS 




faculty advisors; Mr. Harry Allan, Art 




Mr. Robert Bassel, Literature 



DEDICATION 

111 every school, there are individuals who, jjecause of 
some outstanding qualities such as intellectual achievement, 
sincerity or friendliness, have won the respect and love of 
the student body. These individuals, hy their kind deeds 
and inspiring words, bring welcome light in our troubled 
world. In such a category would belong Dr. Joseph Sarachek, 
lY'JJ, our beloved English teacher and Mendie Friend, n"V, 
our dear classmate. 

Doctor Joseph Sarachek, n"y, was a recognized author- 
ity on medieval Hebrew literature and Jew^sh philosophy. 
The advice and counsel that he give us will long be remem- 
bered as we travel along the highway of life. 

Mendie Friend, n"y\ had a most intimate relationship 
with us, his classmates. His own last name would be the 
most adequate description of his character and personality. 
He was indeed a friend to all who knew him. And all who 
knew him truly loved him. 

In our desire to give some expression of the high regard 
in which we held these two noble souls, we dedicate this 
yearbook to their memory. As we look back upon their 
lives and the many pleasant hours we spent in their company, 
we will always be reminded that tlieir spirits live forever. 





the school 




administration 





RABBI ABRAHAM N. ZUROFF — Administrator 



DR. SAMUEL BELKIN — President, Yeshiva Uniiersii) 





MR. SAMlEr, LE\ INE — Director 



DR. SHELLY R. SAPHIRE — Principal 




EMANUEL STERNBERG. Activities 



MARVIN TOKAYER, Co-Editor 




2 

UJ 

X 

o 
u 







MR. ISAAC CANTOR — Spanish 



RABBI BARUCH N. FAIVELSON — Hebrew 




MR. ISIDORE MELO\ 



MR. HARRY MORSE — Physical Education 

10 




RABBI HAROLD B. PERLMAN — Hebrew MR. AARON SANDERS — Music 








Mathematics 



MR. JOSEPH B. STRUM 



n 




MR. MORRIS P. TURETSKY — Mathematics 



MR. ISRAEL "R'ALLACH ^ Mathematics 




MRS. DINAH LEVITON ~ Secretary 



MR. JOHN SANTIAGO — - Chief Custodian 



12 zr 



Seniors 






EDWARD ABRAHAMSON 

Elchanite Art Squad 5, 6; Class Debating Manager 
7; Class Debating Team 8; Service Squad 6, 7. 

Migrating here from uptown, Ed attracted attention 
by getting lOO's on his Regents. Ed, who spends his 
spare time at his hobby, stock cars, will take a pre- 
med course at college. 

"The birds can fly, an why can't I? 
Must we give in, says Ed ivith a grin?" 

— mostly from Trowbridge 



MICHA BEIT-ARIE 

Varsity Soccer Team 7, 8. 

Micha, our Israeli import, became Rabbi Kanatop- 
sky's primary source for Hebraic idioms. He is 
also interested in wrestling and held daily demon- 
strations in class. He will continue his Talmud 
studies at Yeshiva College. 

He gets a KICK out of playing soccer. 



MOSES BERLIN 

Captain of Service Squad 8; Associate Business 
Manager of Elchanite 7, 8; Variety Night Leader 
7, 8 Class Debating Team 2-8; Class Athletic Man- 
ager 4: 7, 8; Service Squad 5. 

Big Mo, our ardent Yankee fan, as chairman of 
the election, inaugurated T.A.'s first "secret" ballot 
. . . Upon graduation from Yeshiva College, he 
hopes to follow in the footsteps of his namesake, 
Mo Turetsky 

He went through the woods, looking for a square root. 



14 



AARON COHEN 



-•*a^»» 



Elchaiiilc Art Editor 7, S: Elchanilc Art Squad 5, 6: 
Class President 5-7; Class Secretary-Treasurer 3; 
Class Debating Team 3, 4, 8; Class Sanitation Man- 
ager 1; Junior Varsity Basketball Team 5, 6; Varsity 
Basketball Team 7, S; Lieutenant of Service Squad 7. 

Bugsy, Mr. Morse's right hand man, successfully 
taught basketball to the "freshies"'. A gifted artist, 
he was also active in school politics . . . Aaron will 
study advertising at Brooklyn. 

He'd make a good bacteriologist; he's all bugs. 



NORMAN DICKER 

Activities Editor oj Elchanite 7, 8; Co-Captain of 
Varsity Basketball Team 7, 8: Class Secretary- 
Treasurer 8; Class Athletic Manager 5; Class De- 
bating Manager 2; Office Squad 6; Service Squad 
7, 8. 

Norm, who made it a practice to be punctual at all 
activities meetings, was also one of the big three 
of Rabbi Gordon's class where in he excelled in 
his Talmud studies. He will continue his studies at 
Yeshiva College. 

"Win ivithout boasting, lose without excuse." 

— Terhune 



RONALD EZRING 

G.O. Vice-President 8; Class Vice-President 1, 7; 
Class Debating Manager 6; Service Squad 7. 

Ronny, our wavy haired veep, became known as a 
muck raker ( ? ? ) by cleaning up ( ? ? ) corruption 
in T.A. politics!! . . . One of the outstanding mem- 
bers of the afternoon Talmud class, Ronny hopes 
to study accounting at City College. 

"/ fear three newspapers more than a hundred bayo- 
nets." ■ — Napoleon I 



15 





STANLEY FOGEL 

Varsity Basketball Team 7, 8; English Library 8; 
Service Squad 6,1 . 

Figgy, who entered T.A. from Toras Emes, was 

disappointed when Izzy left school. A red headed 

basketball player and a very strong, strong boy 

( ? ? ) , City College should be a mere "pushover." 



"The only way to have a friend is to be one." 



Erne 



JOEL FREEMAN 

Senor liked Charley so much that he called him up 
at 6:00 a.m. "to fail him ingloriously." A champion 
weight lifter, Charley laughed his way through 
Rabbi Epstein's private classes. 

Neither rain nor snow nor sleet 
Could keep his bike off the street. 



ARTHUR FRIEDMAN 

Class President 4; Art Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; 
Elchanite Art Squad 5, 6; Service Squad 8. 

Artie, our class artist, an ardent admirer of Mr. 
Allan, looks forward to attending an art school 
containing an extensive art library. 
"True artists are a rare, rare breed; . . ." 

— Cooke 



16 



HERBERT FRIEDMAN 

Class Sanitation Manager 4; Library Squad 7, 8; 
G.O. Cooperative Store Cashier 7. 

Red, who decided that Sunday sessions start too 
early, turned out to be the Senor's biggest surprise 
when he obtained over 90 on his Spanish Regents. 

He thought the man that rang the liberty bell also 
rang the first period bell. 



MANDELL GANCHROW 

G.O. President 7, 8; Arista 8; Student Court 7, 
8; Associate Activities Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; 
Class President 4; Class Vice-President 6; School 
Debating Team 3, 4, 6-8; Class Debating Manager 
2, 3; Class Debating Team 1, 4-8; T.A. Topics 3; 
Service Squad 2-5. 

Mendy, our class politician and orator, gained fame 
as a member of the school debating team. He will 
try to talk his way through Yeshiva College. 

"For forms of government let fools contest; 
Whate'er is best administered is best:" 

— Pope 




EPHRAIM CAREER 

Associate Photography Editor of Elchanite 7, 8: 
Junior Varsity Basketball Team 5, 6; Office Squad 
7 ; Service Squad 3-7. 



17 



His friendly smile and ironical sense of humor have 
earned Eph many friends. A Boro Park boy, Eph's 
dreams will come true when he graduates from T.A. 
and takes the IRT to City College. 

'Modesty and unselfishness are virtues which men 
praise ..." — Man mis 



I 




JACOB GARFLXKEL 

Class Debating Manager I, 3, 4; Class Debating 
Team 2, 3, 6: Library Squad 1-4: Service Squad 7. 

Yankee. Mr. Lebowitz's No. 1 lab assistant, took to 
cleaning chicken coops in his senior year ... A 
future 4H member, Jake hopes to revive the Free 
Soil Party at Rutgers, where he will study poultry 
husbandry. 

"Earth is here so kind, that just tickle her with a hoe 
and she laushs icith a harvest." — Jerrold 



ARNE GUREWITSCH 



Student 1-8. 



Arne's microscopic handwriting has baffled us all 
. . . Because of his w'ide fund of information, there 
are those who sav that Arne has memorized the 
entire Britannica. He hopes to study chemical 
engineering at Brooklyn Polytech. 

Arne built up his muscles by lifting pawns in the 
chess club. 



RALPH HAFT 

Class Vice President 7; Class Secretary-Treasurer 5; 
Variety IS'ight 7. 

Ralph, our meistersinger, serenaded us (in his so- 
prano voice) in our moments of despair . . . Because 
of his penmanship, his homework was always easy 
to copy. 

"And ever as he went, some merry lay he sang." 

— Beattie 



18 



JACOB HELLER 

President oj Class 3; Class Debating Team 5, 6; 
Service Squad 4, 7. 

Jack, our delegate from Bensonhurst, followed in 
his brother's footsteps by getting high marks . . . 
Adlai Stevenson's personal representative to T.A., 
Jack will spend the next few years studying engin- 
eering at Brooklyn College. 

His brains are inversely proportional to his height. 



MANUEL HENZEL 

Associate Photography Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; 
Class Vice-President 2; Office Squad 3, 7; Library 
Squad 7, 8; Service Squad 3-7. 

Mickey, who majored in socials, was one of the 
faithful of the office squad. The president of the 
Back Room Society, he will take a pre-med course 
at Yeshiva. 

She said, "You're not the only pebble on the beach," 
so he became a little bolder. 



AVRAM HOROWITZ 

Associate Business Manager of Elchanite 7, 8; Class 
Secretary-Treasurer 2, 8; Class Debating Team 3, 8. 

Avi. one of the rare Civics exemptees. was a favorite 
of Mr. Bassell . . . Avi will -take ihc laws learned 
in Economics and apjiK lliciii In selling matzohs. 
He will shift his business to Yeshiva in the fall. 

Though many friends he will make, 
A better matzoh he will bake. 



19 





MAURICE KATZ 

Arista 5-8: Secretary oj Arista 8: Kolenu Editor 7; 
Student Court 8; Varsity Basketball Manager 7, 8; 
Class Secretary-Treasurer 3, 4; School Debating 
Team 5; Class Debating Team 3, 4: Library Squad 
1-4; Variety Night 3: Service Squad 3. 

Maurice, tlie class chemist, ison an honorable men- 
tion in the Westinghouse contest ... He might be 
seen ^^'alking through the halls looking for Arista 
prospects ... He will experiment with four years 
at Columbia. 

You can be sure if it's westinghouse 

— lifted from — guess ivho? 



NORMAN KLEIN 

Business Manager of Elchanite 7, 8: Class President 
1; Class Debating Team 1, 2, 4, 6-8; School Band 3, 
4; Service Squad 6, 7. 

Norm figured prominently in the famous Zuroff 
purges. Instituting the Klein Reforms of 1953-54, 
our business manager majored in money . . . He 
intends to stud}^ law. 

"Laws are not made for particular cases, but for men 
in general." — Johnson 



ROBERT KLEIN 




Varsity Basketball Team 7, 8; Junior Varsity Basket- 
ball 3, 6; Elchanite Photography Squad 4; Library 
Squad 4-7; Office Squad 4. 

Bob, who came into our \eshiva department three 
years late, found Rabbi Kanotopskv's sheurim to 
his liking ... In his spare time, he could have 
been found on a wTestling mat. In the fall, he in- 
tends to prepare for a ^ledical career. 

'Life is just a bowl of chocolate covered cherries." 

— Stephenovitch Kleenovitch 



20 



21 



SIDNEY KWESTEL 

Arista 5-8; Arista Leader 7; Student Court 7, 8; 
Elchanite Business Manager 7, 8; Class President 
1; Class Athletic Manager 2; Class Debating Man- 
ager 7 ; Class Debating Team 4, 6; Service Squad 7. 

Shimmy, a favorite student of both Mr. Lilker and 
Mr. Wallach, was frequently retired on pension by 
the latter because he became addicted to high marks. 
He will continue his Talmud and chemistry studies 
at Yeshiva College. 

"So how is baby Mendel?" 



HOWARD LEVINE 

Arista 7, 8; G.O. Vice-President 7; Class Vice- 
President 5; Class Debating Team 2-4, 6; Service 
Squad 6, 7. 

Howie organized and ran successfully T.A.'s first 
non-corrupt service squad . . . An ardent opera 
goer, Howie hopes to study pre-med at Columbia. 



He didn't want to be president - 
for advancement. 



■ there mas no room 



HARRY LUMMERMAN 

Editor of Kolenu 7, 8; Editor 'of Sifriyon 7, 8; 
Arista 8; Hebreiv Library Squad 6-8; Library 
Squad 5, 8; Service Squad 7. 

Harry, our Kolenu editor, was a protege of Rabbi 
Epstein. A frequent visitor to the Hebrew library, 
he was instrumental in writing the "Sifriyon." He 
will enter Brooklyn College. 

"Do your duty and leave the rest to heaven." 

— Corneille 





MANUS MIDLARSKY 

Arista 7, 8; Arista Vice-Leader 8; Arista Secretary 
7; Editor of Kolenu 7, 8; Class Vice President 4; 
Class Debating Team 4, 7, 8; School Band 3, 4; 
Variety Night 4-8; Service Squad 7. 

Manus, who spends his free time at conventions in 
Atlantic City, is a favorite of Rabbi Gordon . . . 
We all look forward to Variety Night when Manus 
solos on his Stradavarius. 



'Music is well said to be the speech of angels." 



Carlyle 



JOSEPH MILLER 

Varsity Basketball Team 7, 8; Service Squad 8. 

Little Joe, alias Maxwell, displayed his talents on 
the basketball court . . . Although at a disadvantage 
due to his height, he held his own with Dr. Lichten- 
stien. 

"Force is of brutes, but honor is of man." 

— John Dryden 



STANLEY NADEL 

Class Vice-President 3; Class Secretary-Treasurer 7; 
Office Squad 8; Service Squad 8. 

Stan, one of the elite of Kay's back room, was 
another of Mr. Wallach's "favorite" students. His 
four year cruise through T.A.'s halls was marred 
only by an occasional report card. Stan will study 
pre-med at Brooklyn College. 

"When you re smiling, the whole world smiles with 
you." — Ipana Melov 



22 



CARL PALEYEFF 

Class Debating Team 1-6; Class Debaliiig Manager 
4; Class Athletic Manager 2, 7; Office Squad 6; 
Service Squad 5, 6. 

Carl, who taught Dr. Lichtenstien chutzpah, thor- 
oughly enjoyed himself at T.A. His jokes helped 
his teachers to pass him ... He will study Talmud 
at Yeshiva. 

Idiom — He who laughs last laughs best. 

Paleyeff — He who laughs last didn't get the joke. 



LEONARD RICHTER 

Class Vice-President 3; Photography Editor of El- 
chanite 7, 8; Photography Squad oj Elchanite 6; 
Class Debating Manager 1 ; Class Secretary-Treasur- 
er 4; Library Squad 4-6: Assistant Manager CO. 
Co-opet alive Store 7, 8; Office Squad 8; Service 
Squad 7. 

Len, the younger half of Richter and Richter, 
managed our Elchanite photography crew. During 
his free period, he mastered a one-hand push-shot?? 
He will attend Brooklyn College. 

He developed his personality in the dark room. 




SEYMOUR RICHTER 

Photography Editor of Elchanite 7, 8; Assistant 
Manager of G.O. Cooperative Store 7, 8; Class Sec- 
retary-Treasurer 3; Library Squad 3-7; Office 
Squad 8; Service Squad 3, 7. 

Seymour, our co-op salesman, practiced his pen- 
manship while writing receipts. The finesse he dis- 
played in the co-op should carry him far in the 
business world. The other half of Richter and 
Richter, he will attend Brooklyn College. 

He loves himself but has competition. 



23 




CARL ROSENCROWN 

Associate Elchanite Art Editor 7, 8; Service Squad 
7, 8. 

The Admiral, as he is affectionately known, set a 
new T.A. battleship record . . . His jokes put him 
in solid with Mr. Gold . . . Carl, our war cartoon- 
ist, will continue his pranks at Brooklyn College. 

Mr. Gold— Order! Order! 
Rosencrown — Tivo beers 



ALBERT ROTH 

Varsity Basketball Trainer 7, 8; Class Athletic 
Manager 6; Class Debating Team 7; Service Squad 
7. 

Albie excelled in the promotion of school athletics 
... He was exiled from Rabbi Gordon's class be- 
cause he wanted to learn Talmud ... He will take 
a pre-dental course at Yeshiva. 



"A day for toil, an hour for sport, 
But, for a friend is life too short." 



— Emerson 



BERNARD ROTHWACHS 

Office Squad 5; Service Squad 7, 8. 

Bernie, a member of our East New York crew, just 
managed to see every test before it was given . . . 
He can be heard walking through T.A.'s halls hum- 
ming the New World Symphony. He will serenade 
the Dean at Brooklyn. 



'Music wakes the soul and lifts it high.' 



Addison 



24 



JOSEPH SANDLER 



Service Scjiiad 7, 8. 



Joe, ail ardent basketball fan (taps I, is a member 
of the "Late comers to T.A. club." He hopes to 
hook his way through Brooklyn College. 



"/ shol a hall into the air, 
It missed the basket by a hair 



Inspired by Longfellow 



HARVEY SENTER 

Elchanite Typing Squad 8. 

Harvey, our F.B.I, counterspy in the mathematics 
dept., was constantly on the lookout for subversives. 
He will continue at Yeshiva. 

"Mathematics is the Senter of our modern world." 

— Tokayerinsky 



ABRAHAM SHAPIRO 

T.A. Topics— Feature Editor 7, 8: T.A. Topics 5, 6; 
Hebrew Library 5, 6; Class Debating Manager 7, 8; 
Service Squad 8. 

Abe became editor of the famous underground 
paper, "The Informer," after having financial diffi- 
culties with the "Topics." ... A member of the 
three "s" committee, Abe will attend Yeshiva in 
the fall. 

"Tell it not in Oath: publish it not in the streets of 
Askelon.'' 

— Samuel II 



25 





r^IAX SHIMANSKY 

It A\'as a great surprise when Max came in second 
in Nelson's English exam . . . ^lax majored in 
extra-curricular activities (i.e. basketball 1 and could 
always be found in his private office I i.e. the gym). 



'A body at rest tends to remain at rest.' 



— Newton 



SHELDON SOCOL 

Office Squad 6-8; G.O. Cooperative Store Manager 
5-8; Class Debating Manager 2, 3, 5. 6; Class De- 
bating Team 1-7: Hebreiv Library Squad 2-4: 
English Library Squad 1-4: T.A. Topics 2, 3. 

Shelly, entrepreneur of our co-op. majored in busi- 
ness while at T.A. In fact, he has spent so much 
time in school, that it is rumored that he will 
succeed Mr. Levine. 



'■//; G-d ive trust: men pay cash.' 



ROBERT SPIEGEL 



Kallnerovitch 




m 



Arista 7-8: Arista Vice-Leader 7 : Student Court 8: 
Editor-in-Chief of Elchanite 7, 8; Class President 8; 
Class Vice-President 5: Class Athletic Manager 4; 
Class Debating Team 2-6: Co-Captain of Junior 
Varsity Basketball Team 3. 4; Junior Varsity Basket- 
ball Team 2-4: T.A. Topics 4-6: Service Squad 
4-6. 

Boh. one of the schools rare Republicans, intends to 
become T.A.'s first Wall Street representative. In 
his spare time in school. Bob managed to take a 
second place in the Hearst American History 
Contest. 

"School is all right as long as it doesn't interfere uith 
your getting an education." — Twain 



26 



27 



EMANUEL STERNBERG 

Activities Editor oj Elchanile 7, 8; Class Sanitation 
Manager' 2-4, 8; Class Charily Collector 1,3; Office 
Squad 6-8; Service Squad 7. 

History was made at T.A. when Emmy, often seen 
doing the Times' crossword puzzle with Mr. Lilker, 
was appointed the school's first honorary sanitation 
manager. He is an expert f ? ? ) in music. Jewish 
and Russian history, and will take his pre-med at 
Yeshiva College. 

He intends to start a neiv jraternily at college — Phi 
Bella Latkis. 



DAVID STOLL 

Class President 3-7; Class Vice-President 4; Class 
Secretary-Treasurer 3; Associate Art Editor of El- 
chanile 7, 8; Elchanile Art Squad 5, 6; Captain of 
Service Squad 7; Service Squad 5, 6. 

Dave, a neighbor of Mr. Lilker, was a charter mem- 
ber of Marty's Boro Park taxi service. Although in 
constant dispute with Rabbi Perlman, he managed 
to translate our Hebrew book into English . . . Dave 
will study at City College. 



'They also serve who only stand and wait." 



— Milton 



SAUL TANENBAUM 

Associate Business Manager of Elchanile 7, 8; Ser- 
vice Squad 8; Library Squad 7 ; Variety Night 7, 8. 

Saul can be found in either of two places, in school 
or at the Met. A member of the T.A. classical music 
society. Saul aspires to write a piano concerto while 
majoring in education at Brooklyn College. 



"f/e who has music in his 
loveliest." 



//. 1.5 in love with the 
— Plato 





MARVIN TOKAYER 

Arista 5-8; Leader of Arista 8; Student Court 7; 
Class President 2; Associate Editor-in-Chief of El- 
chanite 7, 8; Class Vice President 8; Class Debating 
Manager 4, 6; Class Debating Team 3, 5, 7, 8; Class 
Secretary-Treasurer 1, 5, 7; Service Squad 3. 

Moishe, an expert on the growth of Judaism in 
America, held daily debates with Rabbi Perlman on 
the Chassidic and Conservative movements. An 
excellent physics student (just ask Mr. Lebowitz), 
he will study at Yeshiva. 

Ethics and philosophy he has read. 
Kept the Rambam right beside his bed. 



HAROLD WALLACE 

Class Secretary-Treasurer 3; Class Debating Team 
1; Office Squad 6; Service Squad 3, 6. 

Harold, our Poet Laureate, excelled in the sciences. 
He has read the physics book only to appreciate its 
literary style. He anticipates stodying engineering 
at college. 

As an electrical engineer, he icas his father's shock. 



ALLEN WEIL 

Class Debating Team 8; Class Sanitation Manager 
3, 7, 8. 

Al spent his spare time attempting to discover new 
math formulas. A devout scientist, he will attempt 
to acquire fame as an electrical engineer. 

"What art was to the ancient ivorld, science is to the 
modern. — Anon 



28 



STANLEY WERNICK 

Service Squad 7. 

Ziggy astounded T.A. by jumping to Rabbi Kana- 
topsky's class. He attributes it to his East New 
York breeding. An ardent Talmudist, he will con- 
tinue his studies at Yeshiva. 




"No i'reater love halh he than his leanii 



Pope 



JEREMIAH WOHLBERG 

Class President 8; Co-Captain of Varsity Basketball 
Team 7, 8; Class Secretary-Treasurer 6; Class De- 
bating Team 6-8; School Debating Team 7, 8; Lieu- 
tenant of Service Squad 8; T.A. Topics 5, 6; 
Library Squad 7, 8. 

A latecomer to T.A., Jerry made a name for himself 
by defending Harold Riegelman in our annual poli- 
tical forum. An expert in the art of public speak- 
ing, Jerry will continue to debate at Yeshiva. 

"Nothing great ivas ever achieved without enthusiasm.^^ 

— Emerson 




MARVIN YAGED 



Arista 7, 8; Kolenu Staff 8; Hebreiv Library 4- 
8; Class Athletic Manager 3. 

Moishe, our great masmid from Williamsburg, was 
Reb Yogel's prize student. He spent his lunch hour 
in tlie Hebrew library memorizing the Rambam. 

"He put his trust in heaven, and he worked well with 
head and hand." — Anon 



29 




^i^ 



ENTRANCE EXAMS 



Charley Friedman preoccupied marking pa- 
pers . . . Socol falls asleep . . . Everyone passes. 



FRESHMAN 




Shimmy walks into armory thinking it's school 
. . . Some of us buy elevator and swimming 
passes — we'll learn . . . Rabbi Yogel gives a 
speech — tells us to learn with hasmadah . . . 
admit? — What's that . . . One Talmud teacher 
gives free showers . . . Bassell and Faivey have 
war of nei^ves . . . Senor makes Jake write 500 
w^ord apology . . . Poem for English, ''Spring 
Is Here, Tee Hee Tee Hee" . . . We get big five 
for math (Morantz, Branson, Rosenthal, Shapiro, 
Turetsky) . . . Typical period with Charley 
(Hie) Friedman. Period starts 5:30, Charley 
comes at 5:55, attendance, davin, and go home 
at 6:00 . . . Jake decides to bring spectrum . . . 
By the way, what's a Jacobsrod ? . . . Bob Bassell 
teaches us how to pick locks and demonstrates 
his talents for the stage . . We take Rabbi Yogel's 
test — ^10:30, time for a spot of tea . . . Since 
when can snow drip from light bulbs . . . Flash! 
Paleyeff passes algebra I . . . Rabbi Hershkovics 
makes us pay for packages to needy families 
. . . Lichty finds frog in his desk . . . Mickey 
hides Senor's hat . . . Rabbi Karlin takes five 
seconds off recess . . . Minors — all who bring 
sneakers get ninety . . . Wonder why Grossman 
brings a scale to the test? Smarter boys write 
one word to a line . . . 
Mr. Grossman — You were talking, twenty-two 

zeroes. 
Student— What? 

Mr. Grossman — Fourty-four zeroes . 
But Mr. Kipust, how can horse manure get 
lockjaw? . . . Smiley Kipust, BISECTION with 
a smile, test every Sunday. Average — 100% . . . 
Summer spent at Camp Sohcahtoa (Indian Res- 
ervation ) . 



30 



SOPHOMORE 



Julie tells us llie book's wrong . . . 
Mr. Strum : Klein, read from Odysseus. 
Klein: From Odysseus? 
Mr. Strum: No, from Odysseus. 
Waz vou deie Charley? . . . Lichty modernizes 
pants — no longer worn at half mast . . . Julie 
•makes seating plan. Berliner you sit on hook 
. . . Tex Shapiro, the Galitziana with a cowboy 
accent, teaches geometry Texas style . . . Rosen- 
crown invents new fire alarm system . . . 
Student: Mr. Bassell, what do boys and girls do 

alone on Tropical Isles? 
Mr. Bassell: They play chess of course . . . 
What students are taking target practice in Rabbi 
FrankeFs class? . . . Julie switches test . . . 
Water gun fights come into style — Gee Reb, 
I'm sorry. I didn't mean to hit you . . . Wonder 
how everybody passed that mechanical drawing 
test . . . Julie gives formula for home made 
tooth paste; chalk, soap, and guts . . . 
Student: From which Lectura is the final from, 

Senor? 



Senor: I can't tell you but it's between one and 
three . . . Tanenbaum only boy to do Spanish 
homework . . . Senor's test, reads straight from 
book as everyone copies straight from book . . . 
Someone gets 97 . . . Julie tells us how to cheat 
on regents. If they catch you, say "I didn't do 
it! May I please finish the exam." . . . and if 
yoa write therefore and nothing else, I'll give 
you half credit . . . First Variety Night — Manus 
solos on his fiddle . . . Bassell tells us all about 
World War II and about ouija boards . . . 
Wanted: Yellow-bellied coward who whistles . . . 
Bio Regents; Plasma, You Dope . . . 
Mr. Landowne: If Henzel falls out the window, 
Garfinkel gets two zeroes . . . School gets Spanish 
speakipg custodian who doesn't drink. 



//"\ 

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VWS^^^^^S^I ^>>-'^"^'^^'>^s^^^^',<^^^^^V^^^^^ UA\vNV< V^''^^')V^^"^'^^ 



JUNIOR 



Lichty inspects summer school report cards . . . 
Anybody know what AUG means? . . . Bus 
services from Boro Park, everyone comes at 
10:30 . . . Boycott of Bert . . . Louis Friedman 
teaches how to start revolution . . . Mr. Turetsky, 
shall I sit in the front of the room? What's 
your average . . . 68 . . . you're one of the smart- 
er boys, sit in the back . . . TA gym becomes 
annexed to Young Israel . . . Mr. Godin teaches 
French with pictures . . . Faivey gives us sixth 
magillah-hakhel . . . Everybody reads abridged 
David Gopperfield . . . Mr. Gold marks com- 
positions, class average 99/35 . . . Louis Fried- 
man discusses M.M. and her phone number . . . 
Senor: Joel, I'm going to call up your home. 
Joel: My Parents? 
Senor: No, just your home. 
Faivey chooses Calvert . . . Ralph Halpern 
comes to TA . . . Administration gives up on 
Rabbi Drillman's class . . . Mighty Moe (the 
English department's answer to Rabbi Karlin) 
says boys in the back are never awake . . . Boys 
in back get 100 '^c on final . . . Chem: all experi- 
ments bite the dust. Lebowitz breaks test tubes 
and plays with marbles . . . Ya never learned 
calcium? . . . How can you be such a cluck and 
live? . . . Rabbi Drillman writes autobiography, 
"Gone With The Wind" . . . Jan. 20th— Black 
Wednesday, Intermediate Regents. 3/4 fail . . . 
Louis' self-service test, has one. job — hands 
marks into office . . . Curriculum for History — 
Nationalism?? . . . Senor calls roll; Adler, 
Blackman, Dym . . . Wrong year Senor . . . 
School goes to ball game . . . Julie wants to know 
why Mendie yells, "Boy, the players can't hear 
you" . . . Kay buys candy store — attempts to 
become friendly . . . Regents, Senor acts out 
oral comprehension . . . Lichty reads Dictee . . . 
Emmy copies straight from answer sheet . . . 
Bob Klein brings field glasses . . . All pass. 




32 



SENIOR 




So now we're Seniors . . . We break in Rabbi 
Gordon . . . Car rides away with Moe's jacket 
. . . Mr. Strum says we can do our English home- 
work during Math . . . Marty expresses opinion 
of Rabbi Zuroff in Talmud class . . . Chimp 
admits he slept for four years . . . Eph pre- 
sents his new TA plan — Learn one out of five 
days . . . Bulletin from the war front: Admiral 
Rosencrown sinks Captain Shimansky's fleet . . . 
R. Klein and Carl P. go on excursions to N. Y. 
. . . Sam Melov zeroes with a smile . . . Freshies 
take medicals. Doctors Ganchrow, Garfinkel, 
and Sternberg of UTA test for sugar . . . Kenny 
says we're mamish no good . . . Sam Levine 
closes the solarium. Boys caught with their 
pants down? . . . Marty gives short assignment. 
All you know about Industry, Communication, 
and Transportation since the Civil War. Should- 
n't take more than two minutes . . . TA gets new 
mascot, Dan Rosenberg (Badge 8665) summon- 
ses by the bushel . . . Bedford fire sale! . . . 
Gordon cracks down on candy smuggling ring 
. . . Backroom closed . . . Strum uses every inch 
of scrap paper — for a quiz . . . Wallach tells us 
where to get off and he'll supply the flowers . . . 
Emmy gives dramatic reading of Mountain 
Whiporwill . . . Inspection comes: mass drop 
of physics . . . nine brave men remain . . . 
What person is calling everyone else 'SCHMA- 
KILA'? Scholarships . . . Question: What is an 
appropriate gift for a two year old girl? Answer: 
A three year old boy ... By the way, what is 
the last thing seen coming up the Oregon River? 
. . . Punchy gives Mid-Term. Every one except 
Stoll cuts to Prospect Park . . . Rabbi Zuroff 
investigates . . . Who did it? Loudmouth Colien 
or the Union Organizer, Klein . . . What hap- 
pened when Bassell took over Gold's class? . . . 
College Boards . . . We learn life history of 
a piece of chalk . . . Flash .from the student 
Court: Berlin caught smoking . . . Variety Night 
. . . Regents . . . What! I passed them all? . . . 
Graduation. 




33 



fD-^Os^Ap 




s 




















S^L4,^^ytMyiy>*o<i^y:r^ 



110 Clymer Street. Brooklyn 11, N. Y., EV 8-3698 
690 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn 25, N. Y., IN 7-0748 
1278 48th Street, Brooklyn 19, N. Y., UL 4-3808 
332 Rogers Avenue, Brooklyn 25, N. Y.. IN 2-8706 
2006 71st Street, Brooklyn 4, N. Y., CL 6-3845 
1314 50th Street, Brooklyn D, N. Y., GE 6-1609 
1320 52nd Street, Brooklyn IJ, N. Y., UL 1-8674 
760 Montgomery Street, Brooklyn 13, N. Y., PR 2-5314 
1469 President Street, Brooklyn 13, N. Y., PR 2-5259 
675 Empire Boulevard, Brooklyn 25, N. Y., PR 4-0878 
.^ 239 Remsen Avenue, Brooklyn 12, N. Y., HY 5-2121 

1555 47th Street, Brooklyn 19, N. Y., GE 8-5533 
Rd. 3 Freehold, N. J.. EN 7-5932 

436 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn 25, N. Y., IN 7-4079 
436 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn 25, N. Y., IN 7-4005 
2064 77th Slreet, Brooklyn 4, N. Y., CL 9-7268 
9720 Kings Highway, Brooklyn 12, N. Y., Dl 2-1114 
29 Ludlum Place, Brooklyn 25, N. Y., BU 7-3833 
1252 54th Street, Brooklyn 19, N. Y., GE 5-3268 
2315 Cropsey Avenue, Brooklyn 14, N. Y., ES 3-8702 
201 Crown Street, Brooklyn 25, N. Y., SL 6-S579 
1505 52nd Street, Brooklyn 19, N. Y., GE 5-2073 
1419 47th Street, Brooklyn 19, N. Y., GE 6-2777 
421 New Lots Avenue, Brooklyn 7, N. Y. 



34 



,^^^m^^s 







35 



aiUx UX 




803 Nostrand Avenue, Brooklyn 25, N. Y., SL 6-6311 
349 Crown Street, Brooklyn 2,5, N. Y., PR 8-7919 
193 Hewes Street, Brooklyn 11,. N. Y., EV 4-2169 
475 Linden Boulevard, Brooklyn 3, N. Y., PR 2-6198 
240 Crown Street, Brooklyn 25, N. Y., SL 6-8103 
240 Crown Street, Brooklyn 25, N. Y., SL 6-8103 
297 Pulaski Street, Brooklyn 6, N. Y., GL 2-8764 

880 East 8th Street, Brooklyn ,30, N. Y., ES 7-1884 
572 Williams Avenue, Brooklyn 7, N. Y., EV 5-5771 
1327 4flth Street, Brooklyn 19, N. Y., UL 4-1412 
1004 Hegeman Avenue, Brooklyn 8, N. Y., CL 7-2797 
649 Vermont Street, Brooklyn 7, N. Y., DI 2-0994 
502 E. 55th Street, Brooklyn 12, N. Y., HY 5-0840 

369 St. Johns Place, Brooklyn 25, N. Y., ST 3-1511 
901 Washington Avenue, Brooklyn 25, N. Y., UL 7-2581 
201 Roebling Street, Brooklyn 11, N. Y., EV 7-1744 
1320 52nd Street, Brooklyn 19, N. Y., UL 1-8674 
743 Crown Street, Brooklyn 13, N. Y., PR 4-0468 
1136 St. Marks Avenue, Brooklyn 13, N. Y.. HY 3-1112 
1623 4ath Street, Brooklyn 19, N. Y.. GE 6-0667 
285 Throop Avenue, Brooklyn 6, N. Y., EV 7-7654 
599 Duniont Avenue, Brooklyn 7, N. Y., HY 5-0247 
5402 15th Avenue, Brooklyn 19. N. Y., UL 1-6509 
220 Ross Avenue. Brooklyn 11, N. Y., EV 8-2643 



HONORS 



NEW YORK STATE REGENTS SCHOLARSHIPS 

EDWARD ABRAHAMSON '54 
MAURICE KATZ '54 
ABRAHAM SHAPIRO '54 

WESTINGHOUSE SCIENCE TALENT SEARCH 

MAURICE KATZ '54 
Honorable Mention 

NEW YORK JOURNAL-AMERICAN HISTORY CONTEST 

ROBERT SPIEGEL '54 
Second Place 



ART SCHOLARSHIPS 

MICHA BOTKNECHT '53 
Cooper Union 

GILBERT GOLDFINE '53 
Parsons School of Design 



36 




TIES 



37 



G.O 



The main organ of the student government is the General 
Organization. It serves as coordinator of the numerous extra- 
curricular activities of the school and continuously tries to 
get the student body to participate in as many activities as 
possible to further improve both themselves and the school. 

In the past school year two of the most successful G.O. 
terms have been completed. Participation in G.O. sponsored 
extra-curricular activities was at an all time high. Thirty 
students received special service awards, the most ever 
distributed in a similar period. This widespread interest in 
the many fields of student endeavor has contributed greatly 
in making this a very fruitful year of G.O. accomplishment. 

The highlight of semi-annual G.O. activity is the election 
campaign. In the Fall Term elections Mendy Ganchrow be- 
came president. Aaron Cohen, a very active member in the 
senior class was his opponent. The other victors were Howard 
Levine who defeated Bob Spiegel for the Vice-Presidency, 
Eli Lazar as Secretary-Treasurer, Avi Dershowitz as Debat- 
ing Manager and Bob Hirt who became Athletic Manager. 

The spring elections attracted much attention, with an 
unprecedented campaign (one of the "hottest" political 
battles in T.A. annals). Ganchrow decided to try his luck 
for top honors once again. This time he was opposed by 
Howie Levine, but Mendy won again in a very close decision. 
Eli Lazar and Avi Dershowitz were also re-elected to serve 
the school for another term as Secretary-Treasurer and 
Debating Manager respectively. Other new officers were 
Ronnie Ezring, who edged out Norman Klein to become 
Vice President, and Artie Eidelman who became Athletic 
Manager. 



Left to right, 1st row: M. Press, A. Eidelman, S. Ganchrow, M. Leibowitz. 
2nd row: H. Bloom, J. Tesler, H. Levine, Mr. Strum, M. Ganchrow, E. 
Lazar, L. Kershenbaum. 

Standing: L. Beer, M. Hirshhorn. R. Haft, R. Ezring, A. Cohen, D. Stoll, 
J. Neugeboren, A. Witty, L. Rubin, J. Nusbacher. 




38 




Left to right, 1st roiv: S. Riskin, N. Feld, P. Bursky, M. Leibowitz. 
2nd row: J. Miller, Y. Felman, J. Tesler, M. Ganchrow, Mr. Joseph B. 
Strum, R. Ezring, E. Lazar, L. Kershenbaum. 

3rd row. S. Ganchrow, M. Tokayer, N. Klein, J. Wohlberg, J. Klein, 
R. Spiegel, A. Dershowitz, L. Rubin, C. Charytan, D. Aberbach. 



Ti 



he G.O.'s accomplishments of the past year were nu- 
merous. However, there are certain achievements which 
stand out in our minds. 

The assemblies this term were much more meaningful 
than those of the past. One gathering was addressed by the 
Honorable Hyman Barshay, a judge of the Special Sessions 
Court, who spoke to the students on the subject of "Justice." 
Others featured inter-scholastic debates, political forums, a 
faculty-student debate, an open G.O. meeting, election cam- 
paign speeches and a rally before T.A.'s game at Madison 
Square Garden. 

This year a police officer was obtained to patrol the very 
busy coi-ner of Bedford Avenue and President Street where- 
by student safety was greatly increased. 

1953-54 marked the first complete year of the existence 
of our co-operative store. The store was ably run by one of 
its founders and most ardent workers, Sheldon Socol. Its 




39 




management was later tiansferred to Haym Wasserman. 

The G.O.'s annual affairs proved to be very successful. 
These were the Chanukah Chagiga, Lag B'Omer Outing, and 
Variety Night. This year the G.O. ran a special Variety 
Night Club, under the direction of Moe Berlin, that contri- 
buted the entertainment for a very enjoyable evening. 

This year the G.O. gave its approval to a varsity soccer 
team. 

Mimeographed copies of the G.O. Constitution were distri- 
buted to all students. 

A Lost and Found Department was inaugurated. 

Plans were made to institute a Ticket Bureau. 

Brooklyn T.A. showed itself well in the many inter- 
yeshiva tournaments which it entered. B.T.A. met regularly 
with the two other Yeshiva University high schools. This 
inter-school council published its own newspaper which ac- 
quainted students with the events of other schools. B.T.A. 
was also an active member in the Inter-Yeshiva Student 
Council, a city-wide group of most of the yeshiva high schools 
of New York. 





3.ST.M 



40 



Left to right. 1st row: M. Ganchrow, Mr. Joseph Stru: 

S. Kwestel. 
Stamling: J. Hlau, A. Cantor, M. Tokaycr. M. Kalz. 



Fall 



Student Court 




J. he judicial branch of our student government is the 
Student Court. It is composed of five Arista members and 
the G.O. president. 

The duty of this court is to pass judgment on those accused 
of violating our school laws and regulations. Students are 
summoned to appear in court when charged with a mis- 
demeanor. The student may speak in his own defense or 
may choose a spokesman. The G.O. is represented by the 
captain of the Service Squad. The case is thoroughly dis- 
cussed and the student is asked to leave the room. The judges 
once more review the case; if guilty, a punishment is neces- 
sary. The usual punishment is detention or writing an essay. 

Our Student Court has been a corrective branch of our 
government. Through its achievements, it has made the G.O. 
and Service Squad more effective. 




Left to right, 1st row. S. Kwestel, Mr. J. B. Strum, 

M. Ganchrow. 
Standing: H. Zuckerberg, A. Cantor, J. Blau, R. Spiegel 




service squad 



JL o maintain efficient student government, a law enforce- 
ment body is needed. Such a body is the Service Squad. 

This organization is l^d by a lieutenant and captain who 
in turn are responsible to a vice president. However, all 
members of the Service Squad must be approved by the G.O. 
New improvements were instituted this year wheieby more 
lower termers were admitted into the Service Squad. 

The Service Squad operates in complete cooperation with 
the Student Court to maintain decorum at all assemblies and 
help keep our school clean. There is a Service Squad mem- 
ber available in every room during lunch hour to make sure 
that no regulations are broken. This year the Sei-vice Squad 
has taken on more responsibilities. It now works together 
with the police officer in front of our building. To prevent 
accidents, students are no longer permitted to cross the street 
against the light. Throughout the year the Service Squad has 
proven to be of invalualile service to the school. 




J. Sandler, S. 
G. Falk, M. 



SER\ ILK -<.ll \ll. /„,, /;■„.., \ |)„ k. 

Fogfl. M. Hir-(hhorn. J. Grpi-nfj.-M. H 

Midlarsky, S. Wernick. S. Tanenbaum. 

3rd row—y. Klein, N. Kupietsky. R. Ezring, J. Klein, S. Goldrich, H 

Bursky. E. Abramson, H. Wallach, J. Garfinkel, M. Henzel. 

2nd row — B. Rothwachs, S. Kwestel, L. Richter, A. Cohen, H. Levine 

D. Stoll, M. Frieman, E. Garber, S. Richter, A. Roth. 

1st row — L. Goldsmith, M. Shiffenbauer, P. Bursky, A. Gevirtz. 




spring 




>KK\ l(.h M.il \l): (>pring) Top rotv — J. Sandler, G. Pimsky, J. Klein, 

M. Hirschhorn, N. Dicker, H. Bursky, J. Greenfield, S. Weber, M. Henzel, 

C. Rosencrown. 

3rd row — A. Friedman, B. Lapides, M. Midlarsky, A. Shapiro, A. 

Dershowitz, J. Penncr, S. Tanenbaum, E. Abranison, J. Lauer. 

2nfl row— B. Rothwachs, J. Kloner. H. Glaller, J. Wohlberg, R. Ezring, 

M. Berlin, N. Kupietsky, D. Wachslock, S. Grossman. 

ht row — L. Goldsmith, S. Miller, P. Bursky, J. Shraub. 





Kl«n«/«- 



43 



Arista 



JL he primary purpose of Arista, the honor society, is to 
aid deficient students with their studies. This year, however, 
Arista has been of service to the school by aiding in the pur- 
chase of a P.A. system. Members of Arista are outstanding 
in scholarship and character; but they must also be approved 
by the Arista Assembly and the Senate which consists of 
many faculty members. Therefore, members of Arista are 
proud to wear its familiar pin. Meetings are held regularly 
where activities of Arista are discussed. Since its inception. 
Arista has been advised by Mr. Samuel Lebowitz. 

Officers for Fall Term — S. Kwestel, leader; R. Spiegel, 
vice leader; M. Midlarsky, secretary. 

Officers for Spring Term — M. Tokayer, leader; M. Mid- 
larsky, vice leader; M. Katz, secretary. 



^=^ 




Seated left to right: S. Kwestel, Mr. Lebowitz, R. Spiegel. 

1st row: M. Ganchrow, H. Zuckerberg, G. Blau, M. Eidelman, M. Katz, 

J. Heller, M. Yaged, A. Shapiro, M. Tokayer. 

2nd row: B. Lapidus, H. Levine, A. Cantor, N. Bloom, E. Lazar. 




44 



J- rogress has heen the keyword of the Elchanite through- 
out the years. Each Elchanite has proved to be superior to 
the previous ones. 

From copy preparation to final printing, much effort and 
cooperation is required. The Elchanite is run by a board, 
and only through its cooperation can the yearbook succeed. 
The Business Managers are in charge of securing advertise- 
ments to finance our yearbook. The Activities editors organize 
the writeups for each student as well as all school activities. 
The Photography crew take all candid pictures of school 
events, and the Art editors illustrate the book completely. It 
is the job of these respective editors under the Editor in Chief 
to produce our Elchanite. 

This year a greater burden was placed upon the editors 
when Rabbi Faivelson, the former Elchanite adviser, left that 
post. However, much appreciation must be expressed to Mr. 
Harry Allan, our art adviser and Mr. Robert Bassell, our 
literary adviser, for their unselfish cooperation. It would be 
well at this time to thank all art associates and typists who 
have helped make our yearbook complete. 
The following were particularly helpful: 
ART SQUAD— H. Burg, N. Feld, A. Freiman, J. Kloner, 
J. Levy, J. Nusbacher, M. Schiffenbauer, M. Shimansky. 
TYPING SQUAD— M. Goldberg, N. Pugach, H. Senter. 




squad 




Leit to right, 1st roiv: E. Uarbcr. M. lokayor, R. ^pifgei. A. Horowitz. 

M. Ganchrow. 

2nd Roiv: C. Rosencrown, M. Berlin, D. Stoll, M. Henzel, S. Tanenbaum. 



TOPICS 







T 



.A. has always been proud of its student newspaper, the 
TOPICS. The success of the paper has always been attributed 
to the efforts of T.A. students, who put in a great deal of 
time and energy to make the paper interesting as well as 
entertaining and lively. Previous to this school year, the 
newspaper was printed by a photo-offset process and of lim- 
ited size and, consequently, only a small amount of news 
was printed. This also meant that many students who had 
literary ability were unable to join T.A.'s Journalism Club, 
because the small newspaper could carry only a limited staff. 

However, last November, our small photo-offset news- 
paper was replaced by a larger printed one, of which we 
all may be proud. Through this medium, more news is print- 
ed, and all of T.A.'s activities receive ample coverage. 

As the physical appearance of the TOPICS has improved, 
so has the quality of the material in it. The students enjoy 
such columns as Chick 'n' Chuck, Sports Slants, and Meet 
the Faculty. The newspaper also covers events of interest at 
Uptown and Central. Several hundred copies are circulated 
in these two schools. The Alumni also receive the paper, 
enabling them to keep up to date with events in T.A. 




T.A. TOPICS: Sitting — I. Greenspan, Goldman, A. Shapiro, E. Lazar, 
Mr. Sidney Gold, E. Hirschman, A. Eidelman, H. Zuckerberg, Y. Feldman. 
Standing — M. Press, A. Witty, M. Goldberg, L. Rubin, M. Hirschhom, 
J. Newgeborn, N. Bloom, D. Levine, J. Lauer, L. Kirschenbaum, I. 
Wellfeld, R. Newman. 



Under the guidance of Mr. Sidney Gold, the TOPICS is 
constantly striving for improvement. The paper is a member 
of the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. Elias Hersch- 
mann was its first editor, and in February Martin Gordon 
took over his chair. The TOPICS is ending a very successful 
year. 



46 



Kolenu 




J^olenu, the school's annual Hebrew publication, remains 
as one of the few Hebrew literary magazines on the high 
school level. It serves Hebrew minded students as a medium, 
through which they can express their opinions and feelings 
on any contemporary problem related to Jewish life. 

Articles featured in this year's Magazine included, "'The 
Education and Life in a Kibbutz in Israel," written by Micha 
Beit-Arie. The author, raised and educated on a Kibbutz, 
presents a vivid and factual picture of the topic discussed. 
Another article, outstanding in literary style, was "A Shavu- 
oth Night in Tel-Aviv" by Meyer Rabinowitz. 

This year, Kolenu was edited by Harry Lumerman, Haym 
Wasserman and Maurice Katz. The faculty advisor was 
Rabbi Joseph Epstein. Kolenu, under his able supervision 
and guidance, truly reflected the spirit and teachings of the 
Yeshiva. 




47 



Library 




fall 



ENGLISH LIBRARY FALL TERM 

Seated, 1st row, left to right: S. Richter, L. Silverberg, M. Goldberg, 

Mr. B. Brender, A. Wiess, T. Groner, S. Tanenbaum. 

Standing, lejt to right: M. Henzel, M. Zwillenberg, H. Friedman, R. 

Weber, H. Bursky, N. Kupietsky. 




3 ince its beginning, the Library has slowly gained various 
books on almost every major topic of the day. This year, 
under the able leadership of Mr. Ben Brender, faculty ad- 
viser, and Morris Goldberg, chief librarian, the services of 
the Library were augmented. 

Books covering new fields were purchased for the Library. 
They were chosen after referring to several lists which were 
solicited from the teachers. Besides this, new books have 
been constantly coming in from the various book clubs to 
which the Library subscribes. 

The Library holds subscriptions to several widely circu- 
lated and valuable magazines, including Life, Time, Look, 
Popular Science, Current History, and the Nation. A new 
system has been established whereby any student can borrow 
one of these magazines for a period of three weeks. The 
Catalog system of the Library is being completely revised. 
Another accomplishment of the T.A. Library is the Bulletin, 
a mimeographed newspaper containing many features and 
news articles concerning the Library itself. 

All in all, the members of the Library Squad can congra- 
tulate themselves on the job they have done to help improve 
the Library of T.A., and thereby help the school itself. 



48 



spring 




Left to right, 1st row: S. Katz, T. Groner, M. Goldberg, Mr. Brender, 
L. Silberberg, A. Weiss. 

Standing: N. Kupietzky, R. Weber, M. Zwillenberg, H. Friedman, H. 
Bursky, S. Fogel, M. Henzel. 







49 



HEBREW 

library 




Left to right, 1st row: H. Mandel, M. Press, A. Hornblass, L. Skoorka, 
Rabbi Epstein, S. Eider, P. Bursky, O. Klapper. 

Standing: M. Yaged, N. Feld, H. Lumerman, A. Witty, J. Levy, M. 
Lebowitz, F. Nathan. 




50 



J_>/espite the relatively short period of time that the Hebi"ew 
library has been in existence, it has shown evidence of its 
significant role in the development of the Yeshiva. This 
clearly comes to expression in the increasing inquiry for 
books and reference material during the last year. 

In the third year of its operation, the library embarked 
upon new fields of activity. It started issuing reference sheets 
to be used as research aids by the Talmud classes. The 
library has also started mimeographing a monthly called the 
Sifriyon. The editors, Harry Lumerman and Haym Wasser- 
man, with the assistance of the Hebrew librarian, Rabbi 
Joseph Epstein, have made the Sifriyon a valuable and in- 
formative periodical. In its first three issues the publication 
has offered the school library news, lists of books obtainable 
at the library, enlightening material on Jewish bibliography, 
Talmudical terminology, as well as many other interesting 
items. 

Not the least important is the library squad without which 
the library could not function properly. The squad is divided 
into two groups. They are the classification and circulation 
groups headed by Marvin Yaged and Seymour Eider re- 
spectively. The members of the stafl^ spend many hours work- 
ing to improve the facilities of the liljrary so that students 
may use as many books as possible. 

During the past year the library was used extensively by 
about 50% of the student body as well as many of the faculty 
members. About 600 of the library's 4,000 volumes were 
circulated during that time. 



"Sifriyon 



99 





Again this year T.A. can be proud of its debating team. 
In inter-school debates the team had an undefeated record 
taking first place in the newly organized Inter-Yeshiva De- 
bating League as well as gaining many impressive victories 
against non-League opponents. 

The popularity of debating in T.A. was displayed by the 
fact that there were more tryouts for our varsity debating 
team than for the varsity basketball team. 

In addition to the school debating team T.A. also has a 
fine intra-mural system headed by a debating manager who 
is elected by the student body. Each class is represented in 
the Debating Council by a class debating manager. The class 
teams participate in five debates each term. The members 
of the team having the best record receive intra-mural medals. 

A public speaking club, with the purpose of aiding school 
and class debaters, holds a prominent place in our debating 
program. During the school year many assemblies were held 
at which school, as well as class, debates were featured. 
These assemblies helped promote interest in debating at T.A. 




^C&^tCH^ 



Left to right, 1st row: H. Burg, M. Ganchrow, A. Dershowitz, D. Riskin, 
Standing: J. Blau, J. Wohlberg, A. Cantor, E. Herschmann, H. Zucker- 
berg, T. Groner. 




52 




Left to right, 1st tow: H. Zuckerbsrg, J. Blau, A. Dershowitz, M. Ganchrow. 
Standing: G. Neugeborn, J. Wohlberg, A. Cantor, E. Lazar, D. Lauer. 




X his year marks the cooperative's first complete year of 
activity. During the year, the store underwent many changes. 
In September 1953, the co-op moved to larger quarters in 
tlie Hebrew library building. Display cases were purchased 
and a large stock was obtained. 

The store is staffed entirely by students who are responsible 
for purchasing goods for the co-op as well as keeping com- 
plete records. They also act as cashiers during store hours 
(recess and lunch). 

The co-op is sponsored by the G.O. It is equipped to sell 
electrical appliances ranging in value from 5 to 500 dollars, 
but the purpose of the store is to enable students to obtain 
school supplies at greatly reduced prices. 

In February 1954, on the first anniversary of its founding, 
the staff of the store presented a plaque to the administra- 
tion upon which were inscribed the names of those who 
helped make the store a success. 



store 





CO-OP: Sitting^A. Gafni. A. Hornblass, Mr. S. Levine. S ^mul. Mr 
J. Strum, S. Richter, A. Witty. 

Standing— I. Greenspan, L. Richter, S. Goldstein, N. Kupietsky, H 
Friedman, Finer, H. Wasserman, S. Katz. 





Ttite 



y ^ 



\. wo years ago. Variety Night was instituted in order to 
give T.A. students an opportunity to display their theatrical 
talents through various media. 

This year, under the leadership of Moses Berlin, who pro- 
duced the show, and Haym Wasserman, who directed the 
Hebrew Glee Club, Variety Night proved to be a huge success. 

In this year's performance, a play entitled, "Jerusalem is 
Her Name," was presented. Tt commemorated the 3,000th 
anniversary of the naming of Jerusalem. The entertainment 
consisted of comedy and magic acts, piano and violin solos, 
as well as selections by the Hebrew Glee Club. 

The show was very ably supervised by its faculty adviser, 
Mr. Martin Lilker. 

The proceeds from the sale of Variety Night tickets are 
of great financial help to the G.O., as they constitute the 
major source of its income during the year. 





55 




CLUB 




zV n awaited event in T. A. every week is club period. Each 
student is assigned to a club of his o-wti choice which is ably 
organized by the faculty members of our school. Some of 
the clubs are Photography, Mathematics, Chess and Checkers, 
and French. The Public Speaking and Debating Club per- 
mits members of our school and class debating teams to 
practice the art of public oration. One of the many popular 
clubs is the Art Club, where school artists plan the art work 
of the Elchanite. 

A recent innovation to our club schedule has been the 
Variety Night Club. This club, working in conjunction with 
our Music Club, has proved to be an asset to the school. 

The entire club system has proven that when given the 
proper guidance, students can develop their hidden talents. 




Hebrew Club 




Chess and Checkers Club 

56 




Hebrew Glee Club 




VARSITY basketball 



JPor the second year in a row Brooklyn Talmudical hoop- 
sters copped first place laurels in the Brooklyn division of 
the Metropolitan Jewish High School Basketball League. In 
the playoffs, which were held in Madison Square Garden, 
the five lost to Manhattan Talmudical by a 65-45 score. Al- 
though behind at the half, the team came back in the second 
half to close the gap to 13 points only to fade again in the 
last five minutes. 

On the way to first place in the Brooklyn division, B.T.A. 
compiled a 9-1 league record. The only defeat suffered by 
the team was at the hands of Manhattan T.A. Starting off 
the season with a bang by defeating M.T.J. 101-37 for a 
new League scoring record the hoopsters never relinquished 
their hold on first place. The toughest opposition came from 
Ramaz and R.J.J, who were beaten 56-54 and 37-35 re- 
spectively. 




Lejt to right, 1st row: A. Eidelman. A. Dersliowitz, H. Farkas, J. Wohl- 
berg, Mr. Hal letter, N. Dicker, I. Bader, M. Hirschhorn, N. Wemick, 
M. Katz. 

Standing: J. Miller, J. Welfeld, L. Trugman, S. Fogel, R. Hirt, J. Lloyd, 
A. Cohen, H. Bursky, J. Nusbacher, A. Roth. 



p e ci£^£,£f£^e 


fi. 


f$'"$^t^^M^3^^ 


!P-r» 


IMW 


Q 



58 




Lejt to right: N. Wernick, I. Bader, M. Herschorn, N. Dicker, Coach H. 
Jetter, S. Fogel, H. Bursky, J. Wohlberg. 




In non-League contests, the team compiled an impressive 
5-2 record with hoth defeats coming at the hands of Brooklyn 
Friends Academy. Other schools and teams played were St. 
Leonard's Academy, Bently Academy, 92nd St. Y.M.H.A. 
All Stars, and the Alumni. 

With a record twenty varsity letters given this year, the 
tea.m finished the season with an overall 14-4 record. High 
scorers for the season were Irv Bader and Marv Hirschhorn 
with 218 and 174 points respectively. The liigh for one 
game was scored by Hirschhorn with 24 points against 
Flatbush. 

Li the First Annual All Star Game, T.A. was represented 
by Coach Hal Jetter who piloted the Brooklyn team, Marv 
Hirschhorn, Irv Bader, Norm Dicker and Jerry Wohlberg. 

Special thanks should be given here to the team managers, 
Albert Roth and Maurice Katz. 



Leading Scorers Points 

Bader 218 

Hirschhorn 1 74 

Fogel 90 

Wohlberg 85 

Dicker 80 

Lloyd 66 

Wernick 51 

Season Record 

75 Alumni 52 

101 M.T.J.* 37 

37 R.J.J.* 35 

43 M.T.A.* 57 

39 Brooklyn Friends 69 

67 H.I.L.l'.* 36 

37 Chaini Berlin* 22 

54 Hatbush* 50 

56 Brooklyn Friends 65 

70 Flatbush* 64 

49 H.LL.I.* 34 

69 St. Leonards 54 

61 Chaim Berlin* 50 
59 Ramaz* 57 
45 M.T.A.** 65 
56 St. Leonards 37 

62 92nd St. Y.M.H.A 54 

38 Bently 31 

1018 (14-4) 869 

* League game 

* * Playoff gam e — Madison 

Square Garden 



59 



VARSITY cand/ds 






r \ 




60 



Jo¥ 



SEASON SCHEDULE 



35 


Wizards— Y.I. B.P 


31 


48 


Sages— Y.I. E.P 


28 


36 


Wizards— Y.I.B.P 


32 


37 


Chaini Berlin — J.V. 


20 


32 


Brooklyn Friends — J.V. 


35 


57 


Brooklyn Friends — J.V. 


32 


30 


Shields— Y.I.B.P 


29 


34 


Sages— Y.I.E.P 


33 



309 



(7-1) 



240 



JL here are now many varsity sports teams in T.A., and 
numerous others being organized. Recently, the varsity bas- 
ketball team acquired an important addition, that of a junior 
varsity team, to develop lower termers into better ball 
players. This past season, thanks to our school Athletic 
Manager, Bob Hirt, the J.V. had a very successful season. 
Coached by Pete Black, and led in scoring by Moshe 
Polansky, captain, and Herb Josepher, co-captain, the J.V. 
began the season with 4 straight victories. After being set 
back for our only loss by Brooklyn Friends, we retaliated 
by beating Friends by 25 points in our next encounter. Going 
on to win their last two games in very close contests, the J.V. 
ended the season with a fine 7 and 1 record. 



SCORING 

Total Points 
Polansky 83 
Farkas 70 
Josepher 72 



Seated, left to right: J. Blau, M. Polansky, Coach P. Black, H. Josepher, 
G. Falk. 

Standing, left to right: L. Rubin, P. Halbfinger, A. Bachman, J. Green- 
field, M. Kaplan, M. Ostrow. 




Intta- Mural 



/Xs per usual, an extensive intramural athletics program 
was held this past year. This program featured tournaments 
in basketball, punchball, foul shooting, handball, and other 
school sports. An individual scoring record was set this 
year when Michael Ostrow scored fifty-four points. 

The annual Lag B'Omer outing completed our program. 
The events at the outing included competition in softball, 
soccer and handball. Thus, our sports season came to a close. 
Every year, T.A. has had an extensive intramural program 
whereby every student may display his talents for his spe- 
cific sport. 








Le/J to right, 1st row: A. Horowitz, M. Katz. M. Berlin, E. Garber, A. 

Gurewitch. 

2nd row. M. Yaged, A. Cohen (Coaches) 



Champions-8B — Fall and Spring 






i\vkVvvv Vn~:^v\>c^ 




64 



that': 



th 



s 

e 
reason 



HAROLD WALLACE 



Way back in 1654, 

A Jew set foot upon our shore; 

He came to find a brand new land, 

Free from an oppressor's liand. 

He first came here all alone, 

To settle down and build a home. 

To escape the fate of those who died. 

And never again would have to hide. 

That he again may have the right, 

To sleep in peace throughout the night. 

To keep his head up like a man. 

And join the human race again. 

To live in peace, be free from fear. 

That's the reason, the Jews came here! 



65 






,M0^' 



tracing -^c^^^ literature 



At^" 



A ND THOUGH thy beginning was small, yet they latter 
-^ end should greatly increase." (Job, VHI, 7) These 
words, uttered by Bildad in comforting Job, can well serve 
as a motto to the opening of our survey of American-Jewish 
literature. From very modest attempts made by American 
Jewry in the world of literature, there blossomed forth a 
literature extensive in its simplicity, beauty and principles 
of freedom and democracy. The Jews wrote in not one lang- 
uage, but in three, English, Hebrew, and Yiddish. In dis- 
cussing the works of American Jews, we will see that there 
is hardly a branch of letters and learning, to which these 
writers did not make notable contributions. 

It is quite evident, while making allowances for the natural 
increase of the Jews from 1654 until the present, that Ameri- 
can Jewry represents in its great bulk a transplanted Jewry. 
As such, its life, especially in its spiritual and intellectual 
aspects, while it displayed remarkable powers of adjustment 
and acclimatization to the new environment in the midst of 
which it developed, could not possibly divest itself of the 
characteristics, tendencies, and views of European Jewry 
whence large numbers of Jews of this country hail. It is for 
this reason that the best literature produced by American 
Jews came during the last half century, although there were 
some sporadic attempts earlier, with little consequence. 

Leaving out the other branches of Jewish literature and 
limiting ourselves to belles-lettres, we note that the Anglo- 
Jewish division is the weakest of the three component parts. 
The first characteristic of that literary division is the great 
disparity between fiction and poetry. The literatures of 
various Jewries, especially those of Eastern Europe, are rich 
in poetry, primarily in Hebrew. The case is not so with 
Anglo-Jewish literature of this nation. The amount of Jewish 
poetry produced by writers in that language is comparatively 
very small. In spite of the many important events and the 
numerous tragedies which took place in the life of the Jewish 
people in the last half century, there did not arise a poet 
of distinction. 



moses 



Berlin 




66 




On the other hand, there is no lack of poets of Jewish 
descent who made noble contributions to general American 
poetry. The main reason for this is that the poetry of a people 
depends more upon the intensity of the love the poets bear 
for its life, traditions, and hopes, and their saturation with 
its spirit, than on their general poetic ability. It is rare, 
indeed, for a stranger to possess a penetrating glimpse into 
the soul of a people and give expression to its feelings. The 
Anglo-Jewish poets lacked the entire spiritual heritage of 
their ancestors, and hence whenever an attempt was made by 
one to compose Jewish poetry and express the feelings and 
thoughts of his people, it lacked genuineness and depth. 

Prose fared slightly better. The Jewish authors in America 
had very little to work with, as they had little knowledge of 
the life of the Jews in the ghetto. Even those authors who 
wrote about life in America limited their plots to large city 
backgrounds, and completely omitted the towns. Therefore, 
it can only be said that prose was just a little higher in its 
technique than was poetry. 

While English w^as having its troubles, Yiddish literature 
partook to a much greater degree the character of a trans- 
ferred literature. Yiddish literature is, as it always has been, 
closer to the Jewish spirit and reflects all the tendencies of 
Jewish literature in modern times, though in varying deo^rees. 
Whether it be poetry or prose, Yiddish ideas were dominantly 
modified radical ones, although these ideas were far from 
predominating. Yiddish poetry in America contains uni- 
versalistic and nationalistic ideals; the cry of the individual 
suffering from social maladjustments and the plight of the 
nation. Yiddish prose echoes the vicissitudes of the tragedy, 
the laughter, the joy and grief, and all the pervading faith 
of a people — a people with faith and aspiration. 

Of a similar character is the Yiddish fiction. The writers, 
hailing from the ghettos of Europe, were endowed with a 
fair measure of Jewish knowledge, and they portrayed mostly 
the Jewish home. As things changed in American Jewry, its 
horizon widened and all phases of Jewish life found ex- 
pression in Yiddish fiction. 



67 



Finally, we come to the third and most interesting branch 
of American Jewish literature — Hebrew. Without a doubt, 
Hebrew displays the character of a transferred literature. 
In America, there is now a great abundance of Hebrew non- 
fiction, and also a vast collection of biographies in Hebrew. 

Tracing American Jewish literature is in actuality tracing 
American Jewish history. At a time when there was a feeling 
of unrest and revolutions, Jewish writers concentrated on 
poetic emotion and the spirit of the young nation fighting 
for freedom. However, the homeland, Israel, was never for- 
gotten. For in 1868, Adah Menken's, "At Spes non Fracta," 
(But, Hope Is Not Yet Broken) was printed in America, in 
which was found the fervent hope of all American Jews. 
Menken pleaded for the coming of the Messiah, and longed 
for the i-eturn of her people to their homeland. Menken 
protests against the hypocrisy of the world in "The Jew in 





^^^■imii 




■l^riil 




^^^^^^^^^^1 ^^^^^^H 







Parliament." Here this poetess arouses the world to the 
defense of Rothchild who was refused a seat in Parliament 
for not taking the Christian oath. Menken's best work was 
"Hear, O'Israel," a plea for all Jews to have courage in 
their battle for religious freedom. 

Emma Lazarus followed Menken as the next great Jewish 
poetess. Lazarus was a Zionist and she wrote of the sufferings 
of the Jews in Europe. Such poems as. "The Banner of Zion" 
and "The Epistle" display Lazarus' genius and understand- 
ing of life. After Lazarus, there were a few other poets, but 
their* work was overshadowed by the American Jewish novel- 
ists. All in all, Jewish fiction, poetry, and non-fiction, has 
always been connected with the events of the day. However, 
Jewish writers while writing about America, itself, never for- 
got Israel and its problems. 



68 



Hebrew, English, and Yiddish! It took not one, but three 
languages to express the ideas, the tragedy and the joy, the 
delight of the Sabbath, and suffering of the persecuted which 
only a Jew could feel. It is not hard to understand why 
Isaac Leeser organized the first real American periodical in 
1840 or why Yezierska wrote "Hungry Hearts" in 1885, or 
why Levinsky, Resnikoff, Cohen, and Mordecai Katz, were 
brave enough to write about Jewish topics in a land where 
the Jew at first was considered inferior. The above mentioned 
writers, and numerous others wanted to bring to America the 
principles of justice and equality. 



PHOTOGRAPH BY EUGENE LION 




y>fl|&J(r«*>M»"- 



69 



Jewish Contributions to 



iheld 



on socol 



It may be said that in the last three hundred years of the 
liberal and political advancement of the United States the 
Jew has come into possession of his long withheld personal 
rights. In this short period of time he has risen to the most 
dignified heights, not only in one specific area, but in all 
fields to which he has given his devoted efforts. It has there- 
fore been clearly shown that the United States, by granting 
political and economic freedom to the Jewish people, has 
clearly benefited from their success. 

It should, however, be noted that the first Jewish colonists 
in America were forced to overcome various hardships. It 
is ironic to note that the first Jewish settlers who arrived in 
America in 1654 came to these shores to flee persecution 
from Portuguese Brazil only to receive the same brutal 
treatment at the hands of Governor Peter Stuyvesant. Thus, 
it has taken American political freedom to erase the bitter 
sting caused by the statement of Governor Stuy\'esant, "None 
of the deceitful race be permitted to infest and trouble this 
new colony." 

If we may judge by the existence of the pre-Sinaitic laws, 
law was a natural calling for the Jews. The development of 
their law systems from those of tradition to those contained 
in the Bible, and the tracing of the Rabbinical interpreters 
and framers of the later laws, to the entrance of the Jew into 
the practice of the Roman and English secular law systems, 
is far too vast a topic to be covered entirely. It is evident that 
the religious freedom extended to the Jews enabled them to 
pursue the field of law in the United States to a much greater 
extent than was possible in the countries of Europe. For 
many years Jews have had a desire to practice law and to 
help in the evolution of our present codes of law. Law schools 
and academies were known among the Jews during The Dark 
x\ges throughout Europe. Maimonides, frequently quoted 
in circles of legal education, was known to define, for ex- 
ample, the powers of attorney, and methods of suing and 
defending clients in court, as early as eight hundred years 
ago. 




70 






American Jurisprudence 
and Statesmanship 



Although, from time to time the Jews have been active in 
legal centers of Europe as legal and diplomatic advisers, we 
will concentrate upon the American scene in which the Jew- 
has taken a truly great part. His appearance as an active 
factor in law is not surprising, nor is his success in this field, 
though it has been unparalleled. However, as statesman 
and diplomat in the complex modern world systems, the 
forwardness and leadership of the Jew commands both won- 
der and admiration from the entire world. There is not a 
government in the modern world which had not benefited 
during this evolutionary period from Jews trained in the law. 
Once given the opportunity or allowed to seek it, the Jews 
have not become mere ornaments to the bar, but have dis- 
tinguished themselves in statesmanship, and have proved to 
be invaluable diplomatic representatives in international re- 
lationships. The ambassadors to foreign lands from the 
United States who have performed distinguished public ser- 
vices express true devotion to their position. Among the 
Jewish ambassadors should be included the Honorables 
Abram Elkus, Oscar Straus, and Nelson Morris, as am- 
bassadors to Turkey, Iran and Sweden, respectivelv. 

In the 19th century the United States had distinguished 
Jewish jurists and statesmen. One of the most brilliant names 
associated with the practice of law, with the Congress, and 
the period of the Civil War, is that of Judah P. Benjamin. 
He was admitted to the bar at tlie age of twenty-one and was 
already recognized as having a philosophical mind and great 
reasoning powers. He soon became famous in the handling 
of the California title disputes which had baffled the greatest 
legal minds for more than fifty years. He was truly a useful 
tool in the formation of American legal procedure and set 
a precedent for the legal minds of tlie future. 



71 





— \ 




\ 




\ »iUS\3 



Any evaluation of the part of the Jews in the development 
of the legal piocedure of the modern world must necessarily 
take into account the Bible. For, while modern law traces 
its origin in the main to Roman law, the influence of Hebrew 
ethics on the minds of legislators and on the growth of com- 
mon law cannot be overlooked. Moreover, the medieval 
canon law, based to a considerable extent on the Old Testa- 
ment, could not but exercise a profound influence upon the 
civil law which was studied contemporaneously. 

In accordance with one theory which has been advanced, 
the Jewish influence upon American law is far more pro- 
found and far reaching than is usually believed. It has been 
maintained in recent study that Talmudic law deeply affected 
Syrian law, which in turn had a great influence upon the 
Byzantine codes. It must be remembered that Beirut was the 
seat of one of the most famous imperial schools of juris- 
prudence. Roman law, when formulated by the great legal- 
ists in the western empire, was greatly influenced by the 
Byzantine codes. In light of this recently proven theory, the 
exclusive claims of the Roman jurists to the origin of 
modern day legal methods must be drastically altered. 

It is indisputable that the parallels between American and 
Talmudic law go beyond vague principles. There is a rab- 
binic, not a Roman, precedent for the principle "qui facit 
per alium facit per se" (shloach adam kmoso) "he who 
acts through another acts thiough himself." The medieval 
Rabbis evolved a law of copyright which, surprising as it 
may seem, is almost the exact system employed in the 
United States some six hundred years later. The system of 
tenant right or right of possession used in the early days by 
the Jews was the same system used by the Union to help 
alleviate the suffering of the Negroes in the south after the 
Civil War. Although this example may seem highly unusual 
it is merely one of a thousand. There has also been proof 
of late that many institutions which were thought to be of 
English origin in reality were the result of Jewish custom. The 
"Writ Eligit," the mortgage, and the phrase "cuius est solum 
eius usque ad colum usque ad inferos" which in translation 
is the basic foundation of our present deeds of property sale, 
were devolved by Talmudic law. It is quite remarkable to 
note that at the recent sale of the Empire State Building, the 
largest structure in the world, the deed was based upon an 
ancient Hebrew law. 



72 




While Jews play a prominent role in the legal profession 
in America, three of recent date have achieved a particularly 
high eminence and became memlsers of the Supreme Court. 
Louis Brandeis, the people's attorney, introduced into his 
briefs, statistics to illustrate contemporary conditions rather 
than the restriction to past precedents. He made the law brief 
a living document aware of existing social changes rather 
than a musty repetition of what was law. The law had to 
change to conform to changes in society. His briefs were a 
mirror of the man. They reflected his great learning, keen 
perception, his rare analytical powers, and profound knowl- 
edge of law. Louis Brandeis served as Supreme Court Justice 
for twenty two years where he transformed legal traditions 
into sturdy foundations, and erected pillars of support of 
social change to build a political, social and legal structure 
worthy of this great country. 

Of course another great jurist is the late Benjamin Cardozo, 
the philosopher of American jurists. No tribute can ade- 
quately describe this sterling character who was a poet, 
philosopher and jurist. He was constantly quoting from the 
Talmud and reaped a tremendous amount of knowledge from 
the Bible. As Supreme Court justice he made legal history 
with each case where his opinion was made public. No 
greater expression of service could have been made than the 
late President Roosevelt's statement made when the news of 
Cardozo's death was announced in 1938, "I have learned to 
admire and to love him. He had a great soul. The whole 
nation has lost a constant friend." 

Justice Felix Frankfurter is yet another outstanding con- 
temporary American Jewish jurist. Once a professor at 
Harvard Law School, today, he is one of the most eminent 
legal theorists in the country. For many years he has been 
a distinguished member of the Supreme Court. 



73 



Although the contribution made by Jews to American law 
can never be fully outlined it should be said that a major 
conclusion of their contribution should be carefully con- 
sidered. It is not desired to exaggerate the share that these 
persons have had in the evolution of modern law. True! 
the United States owes much to the American Jewish jurist, 
however the Jew must remember that it was the United 
States which enabled him to breathe freely, to learn, to be 
active in government, and to become a useful citizen. To- 
gether the two have progressed to an unbelievable height. 
Recognized as leading statesmen and legal authorities the 
Jews have become very proud of the fact that they are Jews 
and an added feeling of pride and honor has been added by 
the fact that they are Americans. 

The most conclusive proof that could be given for the 
participation of the American Jew is the role played by 
modern day American politicians and government officials. 
Outstanding is the Honorable Herbert Lehman, four times 
governor of the State of New York. A great tribute was given 
to this man by the New York Times when he was reelected 
governor in 1938 by a 849,000 plurality. "He unites the 
practical experience of sound businessman with the vision 
of proved statesmanship. There is nothing in his career he 
has to hide." In 1949 he reached the pinnacle of success 
having been elected to the United States Senate. Other men 
of Jewish descent who have served their country on the floor 
of the Senate are Judah Benjamin, Simon Guggenheim, Ben- 
jamin Franklin Jonas, Isidor Rayner, Joseph Simon, and 
David Levy. There have also been many men who have 
served their nation as governors of their respective states, a 
great honor indeed. 




74 





advertisements 



.■rt\ . AOO^L, «:?: \'o\^-^ 





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:?^-v7^:^'^.*^.^<': 



•'si^'^^is'''* Likl""' I 'TTh '"''■■ f,,"" sir.'''- 



«'SM5j;;»5iS&^Sfe«, 



75 






^5:5 




In Loving Memory 
Of a Dear Son and Brother 

MENDIE 



May His Soul Rest in Peace 



By his forever sorrowing Parents and Brother 

Mr. and Mrs. Will Friend 

and 

Michael Abraham 



OUR synagogue: 



Compliments of . 



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71 



THE ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTIES OF 
THE YESHIVA UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 
OF BROOKLYN EXTEND THEIR BEST WISHES 
TO THE GRADUATES OF JUNE 1954. 



78 



CONGRATULATIONS 



to- 



OUR SON 



Robert 



UPON HIS GRADUATION 



— from 



MOM, DAD and LILLY 



79 



CONGRATULATIONS 



to — 



OUR SON 



NORMAN 



UPON HIS GRADUATION 



from — 



MOM, DAD and ANITA 



80 



Congratulations to 



MENDY GANCHROW 



Upon His Graduation 



— from 



MOTHER and DAD 
BROTHERS SAUL and JACOB 
GRANDMOTHER 
MR. and MRS. GREENBERG, CLAIRE and JACOB 
MISS REBECCA WALLACH 
DR. and MRS. N. MURZIN 
MR. and MRS. A. ROTHLEIN 
MR. and MRS. G. LANGES 
MR. and MRS. H. WOLL 
REBECCA CHARITY FUND, Inc. 
BOULEVARD FUNERAL PARLORS, Inc. 
FAMOUS RESTAURANT 

Eastern Parkway & Ufica Ave. 



81 



CONGRATULATIONS 



to — 



OUR SON 



ROBERT 



Upon His Graduation 




MR. and MRS. MARTIN KLEIN 



82 



WAlker 5-8887-8-9 Cable Address: "Jayposons' 



POSNERS 



JEWELRY - DIAMONDS - SILVERWARE - V^^CHES 
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Photographic Equipment 



74 CANAL STREET 
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83 



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j-^rinters of the 1934- C^lclianlte 




124-132 WHITE STREET 

New York 13, N. Y. 

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84 



CONGRATULATIONS 



to 



NORMAN KLEIN 



UPON HIS GRADUATION 



— from 



A FRIENDLY ORGANIZATION 



85 



Congratulations to 



Robert Klein 

Upon His Graduation 
— from — 



(/J>arton J (l3onb 



onniere 



FAMOUS FOR CONTINENTAL CHOCOLATES 



59 CONTINENTAL SHOPS 
IN NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA, NEWARK and DETROIT 



Barton's Bonbonniere factory, offices and stores 
are closed on the Sabbath and on all Jewish Holidays 

THE NAME BARTON'S BONBONNIERE IS YOUR GUARANTEE IT'S KOSHER 



CONTINENTAL CHOCOLATES 
Compliments of DnKlvlNj iinl-VrnML 

80 DEKALB AVENUE 
Brooklyn 1, New York 




86 



Congratulations to . 



Our Son 



RALPH 



Upon His Graduation 



Mr. and Mrs. S. Haft 



CONGRATULATIONS 



— to — 



ROBERT SPIEGEL 



Upon His Graduation 



87 



Congratulations to 



AVRAM HOROWITZ 



Upon His Graduation 



Benjamin Krasna 

Irving S. & Eleanor R. Horowitz 

and Esther B. 
Jacob L. 5e Helen R. Horowitz & Bertha 
Morris J. & Ethel Krasna 
Horowitz Bros, and Margareten 



^est Wishes to . . . 

SAUL MARTIN 

On His Graduation 

From His Parents, Grandparents, Aunts, Uncles and Cousins 

Mr. and Mrs. S. K. Tanenbaum 

David 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Tanenbaum 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Becher 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Spector 

Harriet and Leonard 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Shaefer 

Herbert and Michael 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Tanenbaum 

Linda and Edward 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Reach 

Robert 



88 



EVergreen 4-5690 



BROOKLYN OMTING CORP. 



135-139 NORTH 11th STREET 
Brooklyn 11, N. Y. 



CONGRATULATIONS 
— to — 



r^obert ^\ie 



ein 



Upon His Graduation 



89 



In Memory of 



BINNIE GOLDBERG 



Husband, Daughter 
and Turoff Family 



Greetings from . . . 

CATTLE SHOCHTIM UNION LOCAL 491, A.F.L. 

799 BROADWAY 
New York City 

M. GROSSMAN, President 
L. SONNENFELD, 1st Vice-Pres. J. GRONER, Secretary 

H. NEIMAN, 2nd Vice-Pres. G. LEDERMAN, Manager 



Greetings from . . . 



MORRIS J. GOLOMBECK, Inc. 



12 WHITE STREET 
New York, N. Y. 



Congratulations to . . 



OUR SON 

HARVEY 

Upon His Graduation 



Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Senter 



90 



Best Wishes 



YESHIVA UNIVERSITY'S 
WOMEN'S ORGANIZATION 

MRS. MURRAY ROTHMAN, President 



Congratulations to . 



Best Wishes to 



Best Wishes to . 



MY SON 

M I C H A 

Upon His Graduation 



Mr. David Beit-Aire 



JOSEPH 



from — 



Mother, Dad and Brother 



JOEL FREEMAN 



A Friend 



91 



Congratulations to 



Compliments of . 



Compliments of . 



SHIMON 



Upon His Graduation 



Uncle Max, Aunt Rose, Simon, Esther and Moishe 



P I L D E S CO 

Opticians 

80 NASSAU STREET 

New York 38, N. Y. 

BA 7-9894 



LOUIS D. KRASNER 

Agent 

26 CLIFF STREET 
New York 38, N. Y. 



Congratulations to . . . 


Greetings from . . . 


ARTHUR 


THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 


Upon His Graduation 


The Y.U. High Schools of Brooklyn 


Mr. and Mrs. Philip Levy 




Compliments of . . . 


Best Wishes to . . . 


Rabbi and Mrs. 


THE CLASS 


EDWARD HOROWITZ 


— of 


and Children 


SEYMOUR and LEONARD RICHTER 


1334 CARROLL STREET 




Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Mr. and Mrs. Leon Spietz 



92 



Compliments of . . 



MR. and MRS. S. HONIG 



Compliments of . . . 



SOL RABINOWITZ 



MAin 2-3119 



ARLINGTON 
BRIAR PIPE CORP. 



200 KOSCIUSKO STREET 

, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
L. Rosenberger, President 



Compliments of 



MRS. GERTRUDE 
BIENENFELD 



1435 - 49th STREET 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Congratulations to 



DAVID STOLL 



from — 



Dad 

Congratulations to . . . 

MARVIN YAGED 

— from — 

Grandmother Rose Vogel 
Uncle Nathan Vogel 



WA 4-6661-2-3 

WESTON CORPORATION 

652 HUDSON STREET 
New York 14, N. Y. 

Irwin Cohen, Secretary 



PREMIER 
SMOKED FISH CO. 



143 GRAND STREET 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



93 



^Congratulations to 



NORMAN 

On His Graduation 
— from — 

Mom, Dad and Henry 



Compliments of . . . 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Heller 
and Melvin 

In Honor of the Graduation 
of their Son 

JACK 



Gorber's 

MISROCHI BRAND 

Kosher Products 

Distributed by 

PRIDE FOOD CORP. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Congratulations to Our Son 

HERBERT 

Upon His Graduation 



Mr. and Mrs. Leo Friedman 
and Natalie 



Congratulations to Our Son 

ALLAN 

Upon His Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. George Weil 



Congratulations to . 



STANLEY FOGEL 

Upon His Graduation 



Compliments of . . . 

Dr. and Mrs. 
JULIUS ABRAHAMSON 



131 CONKIIN STREET 
Farmingdale, L. I. 



Compliments of . . . 

MAUZONE HOME 
KOSHER PRODUCTS. Inc. 

4901 16th AVENUE 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



94 



Coniplirnents of . . . 

MR. and MRS. HAROLD TOKAYER 



61B0 S.W. 16 TERRACE 
Miami, Florida 



Compliments of . . 



THE SHAKIN FAMILY 



Best of Luck 1o . . . 



SAUL TANENBAUM 

— from — 
Mr. and Mrs. Einsliq 



Best Wishes to . 



MOSES M. BERLIN 

— from — 
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rybak 



Congratulations to 



DAVID 

— from — 
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Slahl 



Congratulations to . . . 

MARVIN YAGED 

Upon His Graduation 

— from — 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Perles 

and Mrs. Rose Fogel 



Compliments of 



Mr. and Mrs. 
JULIUS BIENENFELD 



Compliments of 



JOSEPH ZELLER 



Compliments of 



MR. and MRS. SHAPIRO 



Best Wishes to . 



ALBERT ROTH 

- from — 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Toffet 



Compliments of . . . 

ISAAC DUKKER 



310 WEST 99th STREET 
New York, N. Y. 



TORAH and MOSES BERLIN 

— from — 
Shelley and Elliot Moss 



Congratulations to 



CARL PALEYEFF 

Upon His Graduation 



Best Wishes to 



SHIMON KWESTEL 

— from — 
Mr. and Mrs. Sheinberg and Family 



MR. HOWARD KAPLAN 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



Compliments of 



MRS. SADIE HECHT 



95 



Compliments of . 



THOMAS RUTTA 
and Family 



FR 8-0119 

MERRICK CHEMISTS, Inc. 

WHELAN AGENCY 
Seymour Sternberg 



DI 9-1999 

LOUIS J. SEPTIMUS & CO. 

Certified Public Accountants 

335 BROADWAY 
New York City 



MAURICE L. LEHV 

Photographers for Elchcmite 

1585 FLATBUSH AVENUE 

Brooklyn 10, N. Y. 

GEdney 4-6900 



Compliments of . . . 



MORRIS NAGLER 



Compliments of . . . 



AMSTELODAMIA 
DIAMOND CORP. 

45 WEST 47th STREET 
New York City 



Compliments of . . . 



Mr. and Mrs. 
T. ECKSTEIN 



Compliments of 



SABEL and SCHAPS. Inc. 



87 RICHARDSON STREET 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



96 



Congratulations to 



CARL PALEYOFF 



I. Shalom & Co., Inc. 



ULster 1-5522 



STEIGMAN'S 
SELF SERVICE 

5501 NEW UTRECHT AVE. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments of 



STAR BEDSPREAD CO. 



Congratulations to Our Son . . . 

BERNARD 

Upon His Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. Max Rothwachs 



Bes'. Wishes to . . . 



SHIMON 



Marilyn and Norma 
Uncle Harry 
Aunt Gertrude 



Congratulations to . . 



MOSES 



Sarah RaizeU 
Joseph Isaiah 
Nisson Aryeh 



ULster 4-7500 



BORO FUEL OIL CO. 



2 CHURCH AVENUE 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rep. by Wni. Cohen 



In Memorium 
of my 

MOTHER 



Mr. A. Glanz 



97 



ARNOLD SUPPLY CO. 

Plumbing - Heating 
Oil Burner Supplies 



1254-1264 UTICA AVE. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Complimenis of . . 



TOPPS PRODUCTS CORP. 



214 WILLIAM STREET 
Nev/ York City 



To 



SHIMON KWESTEL 



From Your Dear Friends 
The Hellers 



Congratulations io 
Our Son 

ARNE 



Mr. and Mrs. S. Gurewitsch 
and Brother Stanley 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. and MRS. HARRY SILVER 

and 

RABBI ARTHUR SILVER 



Best Wishes to 



DAVE 

— from — 
Mr. and Mrs. I. Stahl 



Compliments of . . . 



Mr. and Mrs 
WM. HOROWITZ 



STagg 2-6292 



MAXIS 
CLOTHES SHOP 



385 BROADWAY 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



98 



For A Lovely Treat 
Take Your Friends to 



HERSHI'S KNISHOP. Inc. 

Air Conditioned Closed Saturday 

4903 12th AVENUE 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments of 



Mr. and Mrs. 
PHILIP KESTENBAUM 



789 EAST 8th STREET 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments of 



THE LE COMPTE CO., Inc. 



100 OCEAN AVENUE 
Lakewood, N. J. 



Compliments of . 



A FRIEND 

— of — 

STANLEY FOGEL 



Gartenberg and Schechter's 

PIONEER COUNTRY CLUB 

Greenfield Park, N. Y. 

Modern Strictly Kosher Up-to-Date Hotels 

All Modern Sports & Social Activities 
Free Golf & Rowing on Our Own Premises 

HOTEL EDWARD 

Miami Beach, Fla. 

Swimming Pool 

Air Conditioned Lobby & Dining Room 

'/2 Block from Ocean 



Congratulations to . . . 

RONALD EZRING 

— from — 
Star Bright Undergarments, Inc. 



Best V/ishes to . . . 

MANUS MIDLARSKY 

— from — 
Mr ani Mrs. D. Brill and Family 



Compliments of . . . 

ISIDORE SHIMANSKY 
BAKERY 

Saturday Observed 

5G2 EAST 95;h STREET 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



99 



Best Wishes to 



JOSEPH MILLER 
Zohavy Creaiions 



Compliments oi . . . 

WEBSTER PAPER BOX CORP. 

250 - 44th STREET 

Brooklyn 32, N. Y. 

GEdney 9-7444 



Congrclulations to 



ROBERT KLEIN 



Congratulations to 



MY SON 

MOISH 

Upon His Graduation 
Mrs. J. Yaged 



Compliments of 



NATHAN HOROWITZ 

Manufacturer of 
LADIES SLIPS 



Congratulations to 



ARTHUR 

On His Graduation 
Mr. end Mrs. Morris Friedman 



Compliments of . . . 

DIRECT HOME VACUUM SERVICE 

236 LYON STREET 

Valley Stream, L. I. 

CL. 5-6535 



BRAVMAN and ROSE 
Fresh Meat and Poultry 

Strictly Kosher 

345 ROGERS AVENUE 
Brooklyn 25, N. Y. 



SCHARF BROS. 
Grocery, Fruit and Vegetables 

Sabbath Observed 

ROGERS AVENUE 
Bet. Union & President Streets 



Compliments of . . . 

LINCOLN WINES and LIQUORS 

407 TOMPKINS AVENUE 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



A FRIEND 

— of — 

ROBERT KLEIN 



Congratulations to 



CARL ROSENCROWN 

— from — 
Fannie Rosencrown 



IN MEMORY 

— of — 

My Beloved Father 

ABRAHAM GELLES 



Compliments of . . . 

CARTOON ENTERPRISES, Inc. 

499 LEXINGTON AVENUE 
New York City 



Compliments of . . . 

RABINOWITZ'S MEAT MARKET 



508 NEW LOTS AVE. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



A. BUCHWALD 

Cultured Pearls and Jewelry 

Jewelry Dealer's Exchange 

37 WEST 47th STREET 
New York 36, N. Y. 



TOO 



DAVID SCHNITZER 

Expert Watch Repairing 

Watches, Bands & Jewelry at Wholesale Prices 

37 WEST 47th STREET 

New York City 

Compliments of 



ZUCKER and FRIEND 



Compliments of . . . 

F. L. NAGEL'S PHARMACY 

CORNER LEE AVE. 5, HOOPER ST, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Congratulations to 



JOEL FREEMAN 

Sam Koven 



Congratulations to 



ROBERT KLEIN 

H. & S. SILVERSTEIN 
Kosher Meat & Poultry 



Compliments of 



MR. and MRS. LOUIS BERMAN 



Compliments of . , . 

LIFSCHITZ & LIFSCHITZ 

Counselors at Law 

320 BROADWAY 
New York City 



Compliments of . . . 

KING DE KING GROCERY 

344 ROEBLING STREET 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Best Wishes to 



HOWARD 



— from — 
Mr. and Mrs. P. Levine and Carol 



Congratulations to . . . 

STANLEY 



Upon His Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. Sol Nadel 



Compliments of . . . 

PINCUS P. RABJNOWITZ 
Narrow Fabrics, Incorporated 

31 EAST 27th STREET 
New York City 



Compliments of 



BENSON COSTUME CO. 

8680 18th AVENUE 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Congratulations to . . . 

Our Son 

EPHRAIM 

Upon His Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Garber 



rongratulalions to . . . 

Our Nephew 

ROBERT 

Eli, Alice, Charles, Judy and David 



Best Wishes to 



AARON 

Cohen Family Circle 



IN MEMORY 

— of — 

OUR BELOVED SON 



REUBEN 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Getreider 



101 



Congratulations to 



SAUL TANENBAUM 

Upon His Graduation 

— from — 

PERFECT WAISTBAND CO. 



Compliments of 



Mr. and Mrs. 
MORRIS I. KRASNA 

377 MONTGOMERY STREET 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 



ABE RUTTA and FAMILY 



Compliments of 



MR. and MRS. M. FLASCHEN 



Compliments of 



THE APPLEBAUM FAMILY 



Congratulations to Our Nephew 

HERBERT A. FRIEDMAN 

Upon His Graduation 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Shipper 



With Best Wishes to . . . 

HERBERT 

Uncle Moe and Aunt Jeanne 



Be^t Wishes to 



HERBERT FRIEDMAN 



Best Wishes to 



MOSES BERLIN 

— from — 
Mr. and Mrs. L. Ring 



Best Wishes to . . . 

HOWARD LEVINE 

— from — 

BENJAMIN LEVINE INSURANCE CO. 

31 Union Square West 

New York, N. Y. 



FRIENDS 

~ of — 

CARL PALEYEFF 



Best Wishes to . . . 

MOSES BERLIN 

— from — 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Levison 

and Moish 



Compliments of . . . 

RABBI SIMCHA RABINOWITZ 
and Family 



Compliments of 



Mr. and Mrs. 
MORRIS ROSENBERG 



Compliments of 



Mr. and Mrs. 
MORRIS GREENSTEIN 

953 EASTERN PARKWAY 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Best Wishes from 



A FRIEND 



102 



Best Wishes to 



BOB SPIEGEL 

— from — 
Mr. Harry Rosenfeld 



Best Wishes from . . . 

MR. and MRS. LOUIS EDISON 
— lo — 

MOSES 



Compliments of 



MR. ZONSCHTECKER 
and Family 



Best of Luck to . . . 



ROBERT KLEIN 

— from — 
Mr. and Mrs. Shlom Chertoff 



PHIL'S MENORAH BAKERY 

733 RIVERDALE AVE. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



ABRAHAM REISS 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 

Auditor & Tax Consultant 

611 BEDFORD AVENUE 

Brooklyn 11, N. Y. 



THE BARNET PHARMACY 

5102 - 16th AVENUE 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Phones: GEdney 8-9558-9767 



Compliments of 



STAR KOSHER SOAP 
& TUMBLER CANDLES 



R & Z 
STRICTLY KOSHER MEAT 

884 FRANKLIN AVENUE 
Brooklyn 25, N. Y. 



SONNY'S 
KOSHER CHICKEN MARKET 

884 FRANKLIN AVENUE 
Brooklyn 25, N. Y. 



MAX CHASEN 
Bedding, Maltresses & Furniture 

154 GRAHAM AVENUE 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



GEdney 8-7438 

ONEG POULTRY CO., Inc. 

4911 - 12th AVENUE 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments of 



ISRAEL MEAT CO. 

1317 - S5th STREET 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



ACE DRY CLEANING SERVICE 

375 UTICA AVENUE 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments of 



CAMP MONROE 



Compliments of 



MANNIE RINGLE 



103 



DYCKMAN'S 
WATCHES - DIAMONDS 



73 WEST 47th STREET 
New York 36, N. Y. 



JACK OBERNIEISTER 

DRY GOODS 

86 ORCHARD STREET 
New York, N. Y, 



HERSHEY and PAUL 
Quality Fruits and Vegetables 

4712 - 13th AVENUE 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



SOL WILLICK 
DAIRY cmd GROCERIES 

901 FRANKLIN AVENUE 
Brooklyn 25, N. Y. 



MAUERSTEIN and SONS, Inc. 

strictly Kosher 
PRIME MEATS and POUITRY 

423 NEW LOTS AVE. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



BETTER WEAR MFG. CO. 

Manufacturers of 

LADIES' and CHILDREN'S WEAR 

521-523 BROADWAY 

New York 12, N. Y. 



B. JAFFE 

EXCLUSIVE CLOTHING 

For Boys, Young Men and Men 

248 UTICA AVENUE 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



BAY RIDGE MOTORS 

6208 - 4th AVENUE 
Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 



KAY-EFF FURS, Inc. 



720 NOSTRAND AVENUE 
Brooklyn 16, N. Y. 



FAMOUS BAKERY 

Orders Taken For 
Weddings & Bar-Mitzvahs 
239 SCHENECTADY AVE. 

Brooklyn 13, N. Y. 



Compliments of 



MR. H. H. HARRIS 



Compliments of . . . 

DITMAS MAINTENANCE CORP. 

1788 NOSTRAND AVE. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Congratulations to 



Our Grandson 

JOEL FREEMAN 



CompUments of . . . 

JOE ROTH RESTAURANT CAFE 

37 UNION SQUARE 
New York City 



Compliments of 



MR. and MRS. I. BLUSH 
and Family 



Compliments of 



MR. and MRS. H. KSASNA 



104 



Congralulalions lo . . . 

The Graduating Class of 1954 

- - from 

BEDFORD LUNCHEONETTE 



Compliments ol . . . 

BIRNBAUM'S WINERY 

(CRYSTAL WINE CO.) 

Pure and Kosher Grape Wines 

179 EAST BROADWAY 

New York 2, N. Y. 



LENOX COLONY 

A MODERN SUMMER RESORT 

Rooms, Apartments and Bungalows 

Swimming, Sports, Playgrounds 

Located near Ferndale 



Compliments of . . . 

BECKER'S CLOTHES 

Closed Saturdays 
Open Saturday Evening & Sunday 
' 4213 - 13th AVENUE 
Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

SAM'S SAME DAY CLEANERS 



196-198 UTICA AVENUE 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

CHATHAM CLOTHES 



52 EAST BROADWAY 
New York City 



Congralulalions to 



MANUS MIDLARSKY 

— from — 
Mr. Joseph Potechin 



MANUS MIDLARSKY 

— from — 
Dr. and Mrs. Sasonkin and Menus 



ConipUrnents of . . . 

PAUL IRVING HATTER 



254 BROADWAY 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

BROOKLYN MUSIC HOUSE 

Sheet Music, Instruments, Art Supplies 

773 NOSTRAND AVENUE 

Brooklyn 16, N. Y. 



Compliments of 



PHIL'S FAMILY SHOE STORE 



54 RIVERDALE AVE. 
Brooklyn 12, N. Y. 



Compliments of 



A. FALK 
Interior Decorator 

568 LIVONIA AVENUE 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



DIEGES & CLUST 

MANUFACTURING JEWELEHS 

Rings, Pins, Medals, Charms, Trophies 
17 JOHN STREET 
New York 8, N. Y. 



Congratulations to 



MY SON 

MANUS 

From Mother 



Congratulations to 



MANUS MIDLARSKY 

— from — 
Al Chaiken 



Ccmphments of . . . 

HOLLAND and McCHESNEY 

(Feed Division) 
FREEHOLD, NEW JERSEY 



105 



Congratulations to . . . 

MOISH YAGED 

Upon His Graduation 

— from — 

Uncle Gobrial Yaged & Family 

Havana, Cuba 



Compliments of 



D. WOLEOFF 

Silverware 



157 Canal St. 
New York 13 
CA 6-6646-7 



15 W. 47th St. 

New York 19 

JU 2-4200 



SHore Road 8-9500 

Blue Boal and Coke 
Automatic Equipment 

SOMERS and CONZEN 

Div. of Household Fuel Corp. 

7th AVE. and 64th STREET 
Brooklyn 20, N. Y. 



Compliments of 



MR. and MRS. 1. S. RICHTER 

and FAMILY 



ConoTcrtulations to 



Our Son 

STANLEY 

Upon His Graduation 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry V/emlck 



With Best Wishes 
— from — 

FAGIE and WOLF SHEK 



Comoliments of . . . 



FRED SOFFER 



Compliments of . . . 

EC FAN-ADDICTS 

Robert Spiegel, President 

Vice-Presidents 

N. Klein, E. Gorber, H. Levine 

and A. Cohen 



"IT'S ABOUT TIME" 



SCHWARTZ MERCHANDISE CORP. 

Manm'actuiers of 

Universal Uniiorms. Sporlsweor, Gymweor, 

Lab Coats & Washable Uniforms 

117 PRINCE STREET 

Nevf York City 



106 



y^ompiimentd of 



DR. HARRY AGUS 
MR. & MRS. S. BECKER 
MR. & MRS. D. BIRMBAUM 
BLOOMS BAKERY 
MR. & MRS. BLUM 
MYRA BREVDA 
MR. & MRS. J. BRUDNIEWSKY 
JOE BURACK 
MR. & MRS. BEN COHEN 
COLUMBIA PRESS 
DA-MOR VARIETY STORE 
MR. SAM DEUTCH 
S. DUBNICK PHARMACY 
MR. & MRS. EIDELBERG 
JACOB FASS 

FELDMAN'S FOOD CENTER 
FLAUM AND NASS 
FRIEDMAN'S BUTCHER SHOP 
FRIEDMAN'S DELICATESSEN 
GOLDBERG'S FRENCH CLEANERS 
GOLDSTEIN'S BAKE SHOP 
MR. & MRS. L. GOLUB 
MR. LOUIS GROSSMAN 
HEAT SEALING NOVELTIES CO. 
HEYMAN'S PHARMACY 
HIRSCH'S SHOE REPAIRING 
MR. & MRS. JOSEPH HOFFMAN 
BERTHA HOROWITZ 
HYMAN'S GIFT SHOP 
IRVING'S FRUIT MARKET 
JACKS HYGRADE MEAT MARKET 
MR. & MRS. HERMAN KOOPERSMITH 
ZWAIL'S FISH 



KURTZ GLAT KOSHER MEAT 

LEVINE BROS. BUTCHERS 

MR. & MRS. SAM LEVINE 

MR. & MRS. ELI LEVITON 

MR. & MRS. N. LINZER 

LOWEN'S BAKERY 

ARTHUR LUBELL 

MR. & MRS. MENDELSOHN 

JULRiS MITTMAN 

MR. H. MIZANSKY 

NEW ERA FOOD CENTER 

MR. L. ORAL 

PARKWAY CLEANERS & LAUNDERERS 

MR. & MRS. J. PEARL 

THE MEMORY OF HYMAN RESNIKOFF 

RONNIE'S SHOE REPAIR 

MR. & MRS. RllBENSTEIN 

SAM'S FISH MARKET 

SARNOFF LIVE POllLTRY 

SCHECHTMAN'S APPETIZERS 

SCHECTER & ROTHBERG 

MR. & MRS. WM. SHAPIRO 

MR. & MRS. D. SNYDER 
SNYDER'S SPORTSWEAR 
MR. & MRS. SORCHER 
SPOT DRY CLEANERS 
SUNSHINE CLEANERS 
SUSSMILCH'S & ADLER 
SIDNEY STOLE 
STRINGER DEPT. STORE 
ALEC A. WEINBERG 
WEINBERGERS BAKERY 
MARKET 



107 



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